Quotations About / On: BLACK

  • 21.
    Had middle class black women begun a movement in which they had labeled themselves "oppressed," no one would have taken them seriously.
    (bell hooks (b. 1955), African American author and educator. Feminist Theory, ch. 1 (1984). Referring to the fact that the contemporary Women's Liberation Movement was founded largely by well-educated, middle-class white women. Hooks, who was college educated but grew up in a poor African American Kentucky family, was a feminist.)
    More quotations from: bell hooks, black, women
  • 22.
    After all, the wool of a black sheep is just as warm.
    (Ernest Lehman (b. 1920), U.S. screenwriter. Sister Margaretta (Anna Lee), The Sound of Music, speaking of Maria (Julie Andrews) (1965).)
    More quotations from: Ernest Lehman, black
  • 23.
    ... black women have always found that in the social order of things we're the least likely to be believed—by anyone.
    (Joycelyn Elders (b. 1933), U.S. pediatrician and educator; first woman (and second African American) Surgeon General of the United States. As quoted in the New York Times Magazine, p. 18 (January 30, 1994). Reflecting on the treatment of Anita Hill, an African American attorney and law school professor who accused Judge Clarence Thomas, also African American and then a U. S. Supreme Court nominee, of sexual harassment when she had worked for him some years earlier. Hill was ridiculed by several Senators during Thomas's confirmation hearings. Ultimately, Thomas was appointed to the Court.)
    More quotations from: Joycelyn Elders, black, women
  • 24.
    A black sun has appeared in the sky of my motherland.
    (Wuer Kaixi, Chinese student leader. Quoted in Independent (London, June 29, 1989). Said about the events in Tiananmen Square, Beijing.)
    More quotations from: Wuer Kaixi, sky, black, sun
  • 25.
    I can only see death and more death, till we are black and swollen with death.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Letter, June 2, 1915. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 2, eds. George J. Zytaruk and James T. Boulton (1981).)
  • 26.
    Like a lot of Black women, I have always had to invent the power my freedom requires ...
    (June Jordan (b. 1936), African American poet and social critic. On Call, ch. 9 (1985). Written in 1984.)
  • 27.
    Besides black art, there is only automation and mechanization.
    (Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), Spanish poet, playwright. Interview, 1936, published in Obras Completas, vol. 3 (1986). Quoted in Poet in New York, introduction (1940, trans. 1988).)
    More quotations from: Federico García Lorca, black
  • 28.
    Body and soul, Black America reveals the extreme questions of contemporary life, questions of freedom and identity: How can I be who I am?
    (June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. essay originally published in Evergreen Review (New York, Oct. 1969). Black Studies: Bringing Back The Person, Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1989).)
  • 29.
    O black and unknown bards of long ago, How came your lips to touch the sacred fire?
    (James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), U.S. author, poet. "O Black and Unknown Bards," st. 1 (written c. 1907), publ. In Fifty Years and Other Poems (1917). Opening lines.)
    More quotations from: James Weldon Johnson, fire, black
  • 30.
    Mosquitoes, black flies, etc., pursued us in mid-channel, and we were glad sometimes to get into violent rapids, for then we escaped them.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 309, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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