Quotations About / On: CHILDHOOD

  • 61.
    To be a social success, do not act pathetic, arrogant, or bored. Do not discuss your unhappy childhood, your visit to the dentist, the shortcomings of your cleaning woman, the state of your bowels, or your spouse's bad habits. You will be thought a paragon (or perhaps a monster) of good behavior.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 62.
    Parenthood brings profound pleasure and satisfactions—the unparalleled pleasure of caring so intensely for another human being, of watching growth, of reliving childhood, of seeing oneself in a new perspective, and of understanding more about life.
    (Ellen Galinsky (20th century), U.S. author and researcher. Between Generations, ch. 2 (1981).)
    More quotations from: Ellen Galinsky, childhood, life
  • 63.
    ... no one with a happy childhood ever amounts to much in this world. They are so well adjusted, they never are driven to achieve anything.
    (Sue Grafton (b. 1940), U.S. murder mystery novelist. As quoted in the New York Times, p. C10 (August 4, 1994). Grafton, author of a popular series of detective novels, was the daughter of two alcoholics and described their parenting as "benign neglect.")
    More quotations from: Sue Grafton, childhood, happy, world
  • 64.
    Psychiatric enlightenment has begun to debunk the superstition that to manage a machine you must become a machine, and that to raise masters of the machine you must mechanize the impulses of childhood.
    (Erik H. Erikson (1904-1994), U.S. psychoanalyst. Childhood and Society, ch. 8 (1950).)
    More quotations from: Erik H Erikson, childhood
  • 65.
    If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it.
    (J.D. (Jerome David) Salinger (b. 1919), U.S. author. Catcher in the Rye, ch. 1 (1951). Opening words.)
  • 66.
    [Children] do not yet lie to themselves and therefore have not entered upon that important tacit agreement which marks admission into the adult world, to wit, that I will respect your lies if you will agree to let mine alone. That unwritten contract is one of the clear dividing lines between the world of childhood and the world of adulthood.
    (Leontine Young (20th century), U.S. social worker and author. Life Among the Giants, ch. 2 (1965).)
  • 67.
    We attempt to remember our collective American childhood, the way it was, but what we often remember is a combination of real past, pieces reshaped by bitterness and love, and, of course, the video past—the portrayals of family life on such television programs as "Leave it to Beaver" and "Father Knows Best" and all the rest.
    (Richard Louv (20th century), U.S. journalist, author. Childhood's Future, part 1, ch. 3 (1991).)
  • 68.
    We Russians have assigned ourselves no other task in life but the cultivation of our own personalities, and when we're barely past childhood, we set to work to cultivate them, those unfortunate personalities.
    (Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818-1883), Russian author. Aleksei Petrovich, "A Correspondence," letter, May 2, 1840 (1856).)
  • 69.
    The limitless future of childhood shrinks to realistic proportions, to one of limited chances and goals; but, by the same token, the mastery of time and space and the conquest of helplessness afford a hitherto unknown promise of self- realization. This is the human condition of adolescence.
    (Peter Blos (20th century), U.S. psychoanalyst. On Adolescence, introduction (1962).)
    More quotations from: Peter Blos, childhood, future, time
  • 70.
    I believe that always, or almost always, in all childhoods and in all the lives that follow them, the mother represents madness. Our mothers always remain the strangest, craziest people we've ever met.
    (Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author, filmmaker. "House and Home," Practicalities (1987, trans. 1990).)
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