Quotations About / On: CITY

  • 41.
    What would human life be without forests, those natural cities?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 169, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, life
  • 42.
    St Louis, that city of outward-bound caravans for the West, and which is to the prairies, what Cairo is to the Desert.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Mr Parkman's Tour" (1849), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).)
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  • 43.
    San Francisco is a mad city—inhabited for the most part by perfectly insane people whose women are of a remarkable beauty.
    (Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), British author, poet. American Notes (1891).)
  • 44.
    The mind of the Renaissance was not a pilgrim mind, but a sedentary city mind, like that of the ancients.
    (George Santayana (1863-1952), U.S. philosopher, poet. The Genteel Tradition at Bay, ch. 1 (1931).)
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  • 45.
    I see less difference between a city and a swamp than formerly.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, August 9, 1850, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 187, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 46.
    If we tire of the saints, Shakspeare is our city of refuge.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Swedenborg; or, the Mystic," Representative Men (1850).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, city
  • 47.
    There are two places in the world where men can most effectively disappear—the city of London and the South Seas.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "The South Seas" (1858-59), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987). A lecture.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, london, city, world
  • 48.
    I hear as good exclamation on your worship as of any man in the city.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 25-6. Mistaking the word, as usual: "exclamation" means outcry against; he perhaps means "acclamation" in speaking to Leonato, governor of Messina.)
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  • 49.
    It is often said that New York is a city for only the very rich and the very poor. It is less often said that New York is also, at least for those of us who came there from somewhere else, a city for only the very young.
    (Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. (First published 1967). "Goodbye to All That," Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968).)
    More quotations from: Joan Didion, city
  • 50.
    [Chicago] is the greatest and most typically American of all cities. New York is bigger and more spectacular and can outmatch it in other superlatives, but it is a "world" city, more European in some respects than American.
    (John Gunther (1901-1970), U.S. journalist. Inside U.S.A., ch. 23, Harper (1947).)
    More quotations from: John Gunther, chicago, city, world
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