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Quotations About / On: COURAGE

  • 51.
    Lay a beam between these two towers of such width as we need to walk on: there is no philosophical wisdom of such great firmness that it can give us courage to walk on it as we should if it were on the ground.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Apology For Raymond Sebond," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 12, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux (1580).)
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  • 52.
    He's nice enough not to want to be associated with a nasty remark but not nice enough not to make it. Lacking the courage of one's nastiness does not make one nice.
    (Michael Kinsley (b. 1951), U.S. journalist. Quoted in Time (New York, July 16, 1990).)
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  • 53.
    I have seen in the Halls of Congress more idealism, more humaneness, more compassion, more profiles of courage than in any other institution that I have ever known.
    (Hubert H. Humphrey (1911-1978), U.S. Democratic politician, vice president. Speech, June 6, 1965, Syracuse University, New York.)
    More quotations from: Hubert H Humphrey, courage
  • 54.
    None speak of the bravery, the might, or the intellect of Jesus; but the devil is always imagined as a being of acute intellect, political cunning, and the fiercest courage. These universal and instinctive tendencies of the human mind reveal much.
    (Lydia M. Child (1802-1880), U.S. abolitionist, writer, editor. letter, Jan. 1843. Letters from New York, vol. 1, letter 34 (1843).)
    More quotations from: Lydia M Child, courage
  • 55.
    This soul, or life within us, by no means agrees with the life outside us. If one has the courage to ask her what she thinks, she is always saying the very opposite to what other people say.
    (Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Montaigne," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).)
  • 56.
    The courage of a great many men, and the virtue of a great many women, are the effect of vanity, shame, and especially a suitable temperament.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 221 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 57.
    Someone who is reluctant to say what he needs to say, often ends up doing so with an insolence whose crassness is proportionate to his fear, once he gathers the necessary courage.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Notebooks and Diaries (1811-1816).)
    More quotations from: Franz Grillparzer, courage, fear
  • 58.
    "Shall I tell you what you have that other men don't?.... It's the courage of your own tenderness."
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 14, Bantam Books (1980). Connie is speaking to Mellors.)
  • 59.
    ... the living, vital truth of social and economic well-being will become a reality only through the zeal, courage, the non-compromising determination of intelligent minorities, and not through the mass.
    (Emma Goldman (1869-1940), U.S. anarchist and author; born in Russia. Anarchism and Other Essays, 3rd rev. ed., ch. 2 (1917).)
    More quotations from: Emma Goldman, courage, truth
  • 60.
    Live can be wonderful if you're not afraid of it. All it takes is courage, imagination ... and a little dough.
    (Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977), British actor, screenwriter, director. Calvero (Charles Chaplin), Limelight, to Terry (Claire Bloom) as he lectures her on what he's learned in his life (1952).)
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