Quotations About / On: COURAGE

  • 71.
    Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear—not absence of fear. Except a creature be part coward it is not a compliment to say it is brave; it is merely a loose application of the word. Consider the flea!—incomparably the bravest of all the creatures of God, if ignorance of fear were courage.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar," ch. 12, Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894).)
  • 72.
    'It takes more strength than courage to be accountable for your mistakes. As it takes more courage than strength to realize what you have to be accountable for, to move beyond those experiences and apply the lessons learnt in that situation. Only then will you free yourself from the guilt and pain, allowing others to see you for who you truly are... A Beautiful Spirit learning the lessons of the Human existence.'
    (strength, letting go, true to you.)
    More quotations from: Annalee Hopkins Somerville
  • 73.
    Courage charms us, because it indicates that a man loves an idea better than all things in the world, that he is thinking neither of his bed, nor his dinner, nor his money, but will venture all to put in act the invisible thought of his mind.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Journals, entry in 1859 (1909-1914).)
  • 74.
    Conservatism is affluent and openhanded, but there is a cunning juggle in riches. I observe that they take somewhat for everything they give. I look bigger, but am less; I have more clothes, but am nit so warm; more armor, but less courage; more books, but less wit.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, December 9, 1841, at the Masonic Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Conservative," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, courage
  • 75.
    Marching is when the pulse of the hero beats in unison with the pulse of Nature, and he steps to the measure of the universe; then there is true courage and invincible strength.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 183, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 76.
    I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 74, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, courage, today
  • 77.
    It takes a good deal of physical courage to ride a horse. This, however, I have. I get it at about forty cents a flask, and take it as required.
    (Stephen Leacock (1869-1944), Canadian humorist, economist. "Reflections on Riding," Literary Lapses (1910).)
    More quotations from: Stephen Leacock, horse, courage
  • 78.
    Do you really think, Arthur, that it is weakness that yields to temptation? I tell you that there are terrible temptations that it requires strength, strength and courage, to yield to.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Sir Robert Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 2. To Lord Goring; on the same theme, Wilde wrote, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2: "The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it.")
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, strength, courage
  • 79.
    In America, the traditional routes to black identity have hardly been normal. Suicide (disappearance by imitation, or willed extinction), violence (hysterical religiosity, crime, armed revolt), and exemplary moral courage; none of these is normal.
    (June Jordan (b. 1939), U.S. poet, civil rights activist. repr. In Moving Towards Home: Political Essays (1989). Black Studies: Bringing Back the Person, Evergreen Review (Oct. 1969).)
  • 80.
    The only rule is, do what you really, impulsively, wish to do. But always act on your own responsibility, sincerely. And have the courage of your own strong emotion.
    (D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1922). Fantasia of the Unconscious, ch. 4, Viking Compass (1960).)
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