Quotations About / On: CULTURE

  • 21.
    Like other secret lovers, many speak mockingly about popular culture to conceal their passion for it.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, passion, culture
  • 22.
    Culture and possessions—there is the bourgeoisie for you.
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 7, p. 513, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Naphta's Marxist critique of class and consciousness.)
    More quotations from: Thomas Mann, culture
  • 23.
    Man's biological weakness is the condition of human culture.
    (Erich Fromm (1900-1980), U.S. psychologist. Escape from Freedom, ch. 2 (1941).)
    More quotations from: Erich Fromm, culture
  • 24.
    Whilst all the world is in pursuit of power, culture corrects the theory of success.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860). Stanley Cavell has argued that Emerson is here referring to Kant's philosophical problem of succession. That is, how can we come to know a world that appears to be a mere surface succession of images that constantly flow by us and are ever changing. As Emerson says in the opening poem to "Culture": "And the world's flowing fates in/his own mould recast." The "mould" may refer to Kant's mental categories with which he argues we organize and order the world. Emerson's response to Kant is founded, in essence, on a pun on "success" and "succession" where worldly material success has also to do with the epistemological play of phenomena.)
  • 25.
    The highest end of government is the culture of men.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Politics," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, culture
  • 26.
    Culture is an instrument wielded by teachers to manufacture teachers, who, in their turn, will manufacture still more teachers.
    (Simone Weil (1909-1943), French philosopher, mystic. The Need For Roots, pt. 2, "Uprootedness in the Towns," (1949).)
    More quotations from: Simone Weil, culture
  • 27.
    The idea of the sacred is quite simply one of the most conservative notions in any culture, because it seeks to turn other ideas—uncertainty, progress, change—into crimes.
    (Salman Rushdie (b. 1947), Indian-born British author. Herbert Read Memorial Lecture, Feb. 6, 1990, ICA, London. Is Nothing Sacred? (1990).)
    More quotations from: Salman Rushdie, culture, change
  • 28.
    It's no accident that of all the monuments left of the Greco- Roman culture the biggest is the ballpark, the Colosseum, the Yankee Stadium of ancient times.
    (Walter Wellesley (Red) Smith (1905-1982), U.S. author, sports columnist, reporter. Quoted in Ira Berkow's column, p. 18, The New York Times (January 16, 1982).)
  • 29.
    The purpose of education is to keep a culture from being drowned in senseless repetitions, each of which claims to offer a new insight.
    (Harold Rosenberg (1906-1978), U.S. art critic, author. repr. As Discovering the Present, introduction (1973). "The Cultural Situation Today," Partisan Review (New Brunswick, New Jersey, Summer 1972).)
    More quotations from: Harold Rosenberg, culture, education
  • 30.
    The prostitute is not, as feminists claim, the victim of men but rather their conqueror, an outlaw who controls the sexual channel between nature and culture.
    (Camille Paglia (b. 1947), U.S. author, critic, educator. repr. In Sex, Art, and American Culture (1992). "Elizabeth Taylor: Hollywood's Pagan Queen," Penthouse (New York, March 1992).)
    More quotations from: Camille Paglia, culture, nature
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