Quotations About / On: CULTURE

  • 21.
    ... the novelist is bound by the reasonable possibilities, not the probabilities, of his culture.
    (Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 5 (1969). From "Novelist and Believer," a paper given in March 1963 at a symposium at Sweet Briar College, Virginia.)
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  • 22.
    Outside of Paris, there is no hope for the cultured.
    (Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Mascarille, in Les Précieuses Ridicules, sc. 9 (1659).)
  • 23.
    Culture requires in the first place a certain balance of material and spiritual values.
    (Johan Huizinga (1872-1945), Dutch historian. In the Shadow of Tomorrow, ch. 4 (1936).)
    More quotations from: Johan Huizinga, culture
  • 24.
    Culture means control over nature.
    (Johan Huizinga (1872-1945), Dutch historian. In the Shadow of Tomorrow, ch. 4 (1936).)
    More quotations from: Johan Huizinga, culture, nature
  • 25.
    Being cultured is the least expensive form of respectability.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourteenth Selection, New York (1994).)
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  • 26.
    Like other secret lovers, many speak mockingly about popular culture to conceal their passion for it.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, passion, culture
  • 27.
    Culture and possessions—there is the bourgeoisie for you.
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 7, p. 513, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Naphta's Marxist critique of class and consciousness.)
    More quotations from: Thomas Mann, culture
  • 28.
    Man's biological weakness is the condition of human culture.
    (Erich Fromm (1900-1980), U.S. psychologist. Escape from Freedom, ch. 2 (1941).)
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  • 29.
    Whilst all the world is in pursuit of power, culture corrects the theory of success.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860). Stanley Cavell has argued that Emerson is here referring to Kant's philosophical problem of succession. That is, how can we come to know a world that appears to be a mere surface succession of images that constantly flow by us and are ever changing. As Emerson says in the opening poem to "Culture": "And the world's flowing fates in/his own mould recast." The "mould" may refer to Kant's mental categories with which he argues we organize and order the world. Emerson's response to Kant is founded, in essence, on a pun on "success" and "succession" where worldly material success has also to do with the epistemological play of phenomena.)
  • 30.
    The highest end of government is the culture of men.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Politics," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, culture
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