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Quotations About / On: CULTURE

  • 71.
    Not out of those, on whom systems of education have exhausted their culture, comes the helpful giant to destroy the old or to build the new, but out of unhandselled savage nature, out of terrible Druids and Berserkirs, come at last Alfred and Shakespeare.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Oration, August 31, 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Cambridge, Massachusetts. "The American Scholar," repr. In Emerson: Essays and Lectures, ed. Joel Porte (1983).)
  • 72.
    The saint and poet seek privacy to ends the most public and universal: and it is the secret of culture, to interest the man more in his public, than in his private quality.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, culture
  • 73.
    The Bostonians take their learning too sadly: culture with them is an accomplishment rather than an atmosphere; their "Hub," as they call it, is the paradise of prigs.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 1887).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, culture
  • 74.
    In rhetoric, this art of omission is a chief secret of power, and, in general, it is proof of high culture to say the greatest matters in the simplest way.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Beauty," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, culture, power
  • 75.
    England produces under favorable conditions of ease and culture the finest women in the world. And, as the men are affectionate and true-hearted, the women inspire and refine them.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Manners," English Traits (1856).)
  • 76.
    The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Civil Disobedience," originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government" (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 372, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, culture
  • 77.
    A cheerful intelligent face is the end of culture, and success enough. For it indicates the purpose of Nature and wisdom attained.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 78.
    Those who speak of our culture as dead or dying have a quarrel with life, and I think they cannot understand its terms, but must endlessly repeat the projection of their own desires.
    (Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), U.S. poet. The Life of Poetry, ch. 3 (1949).)
  • 79.
    I sometimes have the sense that I live my life as a writer with my nose pressed against the wide, shiny plate glass window of the "mainstream" culture. The world seems full of straight, large-circulation, slick periodicals which wouldn't think of reviewing my book and bookstores which will never order it.
    (Jan Clausen (b. 1943), U.S. author, editor, and lesbian feminist. A Movement of Poets (1982). Clausen published her fiction and poetry through "small" or "alternative" presses and magazines.)
  • 80.
    The sceptics, a kind of nomads, despising all settled culture of the land, broke up from time to time all civil society. Fortunately their number was small, and they could not prevent the old settlers from returning to cultivate the ground afresh, though without any fixed plan or agreement.
    (Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), German philosopher. Critique of Pure Reason, Introduction, p. 2, Kant Selections, ed. T.M. Greene, Scribners, New York (1920). Kant's evaluation of skepticism.)
    More quotations from: Immanuel Kant, culture, time
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