Quotations About / On: DANCE

  • 41.
    Remember to take the best dancing master at Berlin, more to teach you to sit, stand, and walk gracefully, than to dance finely. The Graces, the Graces; remember the Graces!
    (Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694-1773), British statesman, man of letters. letter, Jan. 10, 1749, Letters Written by the Late Right Honourable Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl, Earl of Chesterfield, to his Son, Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl, Esq, 5th ed., vol. II, p. 132, London (1774).)
  • 42.
    When I dance, I dance; when I sleep, I sleep; yes, and when I walk alone in a beautiful orchard, if my thoughts have been dwelling elsewhere, I bring them back to the walk, to the orchard, to the sweetness of this solitude, and to me.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Experience," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 13, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).)
  • 43.
    In song and dance man expresses himself as a member of a higher community: he has forgotten how to walk and speak and is on the way toward flying up into the air, dancing.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter 1980. Basic Writings of Nietzsche, p. 37, trans. and ed. By Walter Kaufmann, New York, Modern Library (1968). The Birth of Tragedy, section 1 (1872).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, dance, song
  • 44.
    I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principle duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or to marry them selves, have no business with the partners or wives of the neighbors.
    (Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Henry Tilney in Northanger Abbey, ch. 10 (1818).)
    More quotations from: Jane Austen, dance, marriage
  • 45.
    That is what war is and dancing it is forward and back, when one is out walking one wants not to go back the way they came but in dancing and in war it is forward and back.
    (Gertrude Stein (1874-1946), U.S. author. Everybody's Autobiography, Random House (1937).)
    More quotations from: Gertrude Stein, war
  • 46.
    The dance can reveal everything mysterious that is hidden in music, and it has the additional merit of being human and palpable. Dancing is poetry with arms and legs.
    (Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.)
  • 47.
    Love has had a cast of millions millions billions throughout history. But it is always the personification of a single dancing or kissing couple. It is the essential single solitary pair standing glowing in the spotlight of eternity.
    (Terence George Craddock)
  • 48.
    Over there, in Europe, all was shame and anger. Here it was exile or solitude, among these languid and agitated madmen who danced in order to die.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. D'Arrast in Brazil, in Exile and the Kingdom, "The Growing Stone," p. 174, Gallimard (1957).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, anger, solitude
  • 49.
    At male strip shows, it is still the women that we watch, the audience of women and their eager faces. They are more obscene than if they were dancing naked themselves.
    (Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929), French semiologist. Cool Memories, ch. 2 (1987, trans. 1990).)
    More quotations from: Jean Baudrillard, women
  • 50.
    I say to you: we must still have chaos within us to be able to give birth to a dancing star. I say to you: you still have chaos within you.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 19, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, First Part, "Prologue," section 5 (1883).)
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