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Quotations About / On: DANCE

  • 51.
    A man may appear learned, without talking Sentences; as in his ordinary Gesture he discovers he can Dance, tho' he does not cut Capers.
    (Richard Steele (1672-1729), British author. Mr. Spectator, in The Spectator, No. 4 (1711). By "sentences" Steele means aphorisms.)
    More quotations from: Richard Steele, dance, cut
  • 52.
    Mr. Lincoln at least you're a man of honor. You said you wanted to dance with me in the worst way, and I must say that you've kept your word. That's the worst way I've ever seen.
    (Lamar Trotti (1898-1952), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Mary Todd (Marjorie Weaver), Young Mr. Lincoln, commenting on Lincoln's (Henry Fonda) awkwardness on the dance floor (1939). Based on the life of Lincoln.)
    More quotations from: Lamar Trotti, dance
  • 53.
    I try to make a rough music, a dance of the mind, a calculus of the emotions, a driving beat of praise out of the pain and mystery that surround me and become me. My poems are meant to make your mind get up and shout.
    (Judith Johnson Sherwin (b. 1936), U.S. poet. As quoted in Contemporary Poets, 3rd ed., by James Vinson (1980).)
  • 54.
    The same people who are murdered slowly in the mechanized slaughterhouses of work are also arguing, singing, drinking, dancing, making love, holding the streets, picking up weapons and inventing a new poetry.
    (Raoul Vaneigem (b. 1934), Belgian situationist philosopher. The Revolution of Everyday Life, ch. 5 (1967, trans. 1983).)
  • 55.
    A speech is poetry: cadence, rhythm, imagery, sweep! A speech reminds us that words, like children, have the power to make dance the dullest beanbag of a heart.
    (Peggy Noonan (b. 1950), U.S. author, presidential speechwriter. What I Saw at the Revolution, ch. 5 (1990).)
  • 56.
    How do you expect to learn to dance when you have not even learned to walk! And above the dancer is still the flyer and his bliss.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 556, selection 17[59], eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to Fall 1883.)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, dance
  • 57.
    Relying on any one disciplinary approach—time-out, negotiation, tough love, the star system—puts the parenting team at risk. Why? Because children adapt to any method very quickly; today's effective technique becomes tomorrow's worn dance.
    (Ron Taffel (20th century), U.S. writer, psychologist. Why Parents Disagree, ch. 7 (1994).)
  • 58.
    Dancing is a wonderful training for girls, it's the first way you learn to guess what a man is going to do before he does it.
    (Christopher Morley (1890-1957), U.S. novelist, journalist, poet. Kitty Foyle, ch. 11 (1939).)
    More quotations from: Christopher Morley
  • 59.
    Players, Sir! I look on them as no better than creatures set upon tables and joint stools to make faces and produce laughter, like dancing dogs.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, October [?] 1775 (1791).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, laughter
  • 60.
    I am for those who believe in loose delights, I share the midnight orgies of young men,
    I dance with the dancers and drink with the drinkers.
    (Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Native Moments.)
    More quotations from: Walt Whitman, dance, believe
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