Quotations About / On: DEATH

  • 51.
    For children preserve the fame of a man after his death.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 505.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, fame, death, children
  • 52.
    But fantasy kills imagination, pornography is death to art.
    (Iris Murdoch (b. 1919), British novelist, philosopher. Alfred Ludens, in The Message to the Planet, pt. 1 (1989).)
    More quotations from: Iris Murdoch, imagination, death
  • 53.
    On neither the sun, nor death, can a man look fixedly.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. Maximes, no. 26 (1678).)
  • 54.
    Men sooner forget the death of their father than the loss of their patrimony.
    (Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), Italian political philosopher, statesman. The Prince, ch. 17 (1514).)
  • 55.
    Life levels all men. Death reveals the eminent.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. "Maxims for Revolutionists: Fame," Man and Superman (1903).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, death, life
  • 56.
    The main facts in human life are five: birth, food, sleep, love and death.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Aspects of the Novel, ch. 3 (1927).)
  • 57.
    At the moment of death I hope to be surprised.
    (Ivan Illich (b. 1926), Austrian-born U.S. theologian, author. Quoted in Sunday Times (London, November 20, 1988). In reply to a question on his beliefs about the afterlife.)
    More quotations from: Ivan Illich, hope, death
  • 58.
    I think it beats the heck out of life after death, that's for sure.
    (Martina Navratilova (b. 1956), U.S. tennis player; born and raised in Czechoslovakia. As quoted in People magazine, p. 116 (September 13, 1993). On how she envisioned life after tennis. A competitive player for twenty-one years, she was planning to retire.)
    More quotations from: Martina Navratilova, death, life
  • 59.
    There dwell the children of the dark Night, the dread gods Sleep and Death.
    (Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.), Greek didactic poet. Theogony, 603.)
  • 60.
    He who is obsessed by death is made guilty by it.
    (Elias Canetti (b. 1905), Austrian novelist, philosopher. "1973," The Secret Heart of the Clock: Notes, Aphorisms, Fragments 1973-1985 (1991).)
    More quotations from: Elias Canetti, death
[Report Error]