Quotations About / On: DYING

  • 1.
    For a courageous man cannot die dishonorably, a man who has attained the consulship cannot die before his time, a philosopher cannot die wretchedly.
    (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. IV, 3.)
    More quotations from: Marcus Tullius Cicero, time
  • 2.
    Men die in despair, while spirits die in ecstasy.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835). Explanation of Swedenborg's philosophy.)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, despair
  • 3.
    To abandon oneself to principles is really to die—and to die for an impossible love which is the contrary of love.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. "The Regicides," pt. 3, The Rebel (1951, trans. 1953).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, love
  • 4.
    I will die if I lose you, but I will die if I wait longer.
    (Jean Racine (1639-1699), French playwright. Pyrrhus, in Andromache, act 3, sc. 7 (1667). Pyrrhus makes an ultimatum to Andromache to marry him.)
    More quotations from: Jean Racine
  • 5.
    A man may be born, but in order to be born he must first die, and in order to die he must first awake.
    (George Gurdjieff (c. 1877-1949), Greek-Armenian religious teacher, mystic. Quoted in P.D. Ouspensky, In Search of the Miraculous, ch. 11 (1949). Gurdjieff continued: "If a man dies without having been awakened he cannot be born. If a man is born without having died he may become an 'immortal thing.' Thus the fact that he has not 'died' prevents a man from being 'born'; the fact of his not having awakened prevents him from 'dying'; and should he be born without having died he is prevented from 'being.'...")
    More quotations from: George Gurdjieff
  • 6.
    I would die for my country, but I could never let my country die for me.
    (Neil Kinnock (b. 1942), British Labour politician. Speech, September 30, 1986, to Labour Party Conference on nuclear disarmament. Quoted in Guardian (London, October 1, 1986).)
    More quotations from: Neil Kinnock
  • 7.
    A friend who dies, it's something of you who dies.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Pensées de Gustave Flaubert, p. 10, Conard (1915).)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert, friend
  • 8.
    Who wants a world in which the guarantee that we shall not die of starvation entails the risk of dying of boredom?
    (Raoul Vaneigem (b. 1934), Belgian Situationist philosopher. The Revolution of Everyday Life, introduction (1967, trans. 1983).)
    More quotations from: Raoul Vaneigem, dying, world
  • 9.
    Men are never really willing to die except for the sake of freedom: therefore they do not believe in dying completely.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. "Historic Murder," pt. 5, The Rebel (1951, trans. 1953).)
  • 10.
    To die is poignantly bitter, but the idea of having to die without having lived is unbearable.
    (Erich Fromm (1900-1980), U.S. psychologist. Man for Himself, ch. 4 (1947).)
    More quotations from: Erich Fromm
[Hata Bildir]