Quotations About / On: DYING

  • 11.
    I will die if I lose you, but I will die if I wait longer.
    (Jean Racine (1639-1699), French playwright. Pyrrhus, in Andromache, act 3, sc. 7 (1667). Pyrrhus makes an ultimatum to Andromache to marry him.)
    More quotations from: Jean Racine
  • 12.
    I would die for my country, but I could never let my country die for me.
    (Neil Kinnock (b. 1942), British Labour politician. Speech, September 30, 1986, to Labour Party Conference on nuclear disarmament. Quoted in Guardian (London, October 1, 1986).)
    More quotations from: Neil Kinnock
  • 13.
    A friend who dies, it's something of you who dies.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Pensées de Gustave Flaubert, p. 10, Conard (1915).)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert, friend
  • 14.
    To die is but to leave off dying and do the thing once for all.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 255 (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, dying, leave
  • 15.
    Reverence does not die with mortals, nor does it perish whether they live or die.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Philoctetes, l. 1443.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles
  • 16.
    Die was sind, wissen, dass sie nichts sind und die nichts sind, wissen, dass sie was sind.
    (Shqipe Prence)
    More quotations from: Shqipe Prence
  • 17.
    We all die, but do we die? ? In the hearts and minds of those who care about us, we can live on forever
    (Profanisaurus)
    More quotations from: John Westlake
  • 18.
    Instead of being a brave soldier, dying at my post with my gun to my neck, i'ld rather be a writer, dying on my table with my pen to my hand.
    (A die-hard writer)
    More quotations from: Alexander Onoja
  • 19.
    A man does not die of love or his liver or even of old age; he dies of being a man.
    (Percival Arland Ussher (1899-1980), Irish author, critic. An Alphabet of Aphorisms (1955).)
    More quotations from: Percival Arland Ussher, love
  • 20.
    To abandon oneself to principles is really to die—and to die for an impossible love which is the contrary of love.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. "The Regicides," pt. 3, The Rebel (1951, trans. 1953).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, love
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