Quotations About / On: DYING

  • 21.
    A man does not die of love or his liver or even of old age; he dies of being a man.
    (Percival Arland Ussher (1899-1980), Irish author, critic. An Alphabet of Aphorisms (1955).)
    More quotations from: Percival Arland Ussher, love
  • 22.
    To abandon oneself to principles is really to die—and to die for an impossible love which is the contrary of love.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. "The Regicides," pt. 3, The Rebel (1951, trans. 1953).)
    More quotations from: Albert Camus, love
  • 23.
    A man may be born, but in order to be born he must first die, and in order to die he must first awake.
    (George Gurdjieff (c. 1877-1949), Greek-Armenian religious teacher, mystic. Quoted in P.D. Ouspensky, In Search of the Miraculous, ch. 11 (1949). Gurdjieff continued: "If a man dies without having been awakened he cannot be born. If a man is born without having died he may become an 'immortal thing.' Thus the fact that he has not 'died' prevents a man from being 'born'; the fact of his not having awakened prevents him from 'dying'; and should he be born without having died he is prevented from 'being.'...")
    More quotations from: George Gurdjieff
  • 24.
    Has there ever been a society which has died of dissent? Several have died of conformity in our lifetime.
    (Jacob Bronowski (1908-1974), British scientist, author. Lecture, March 19, 1953, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "The Sense of Human Dignity," sct. 5, Science and Human Values (1961).)
    More quotations from: Jacob Bronowski
  • 25.
    Who wants a world in which the guarantee that we shall not die of starvation entails the risk of dying of boredom?
    (Raoul Vaneigem (b. 1934), Belgian Situationist philosopher. The Revolution of Everyday Life, introduction (1967, trans. 1983).)
    More quotations from: Raoul Vaneigem, dying, world
  • 26.
    Men are never really willing to die except for the sake of freedom: therefore they do not believe in dying completely.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian philosopher, author. "Historic Murder," pt. 5, The Rebel (1951, trans. 1953).)
  • 27.
    To die is poignantly bitter, but the idea of having to die without having lived is unbearable.
    (Erich Fromm (1900-1980), U.S. psychologist. Man for Himself, ch. 4 (1947).)
    More quotations from: Erich Fromm
  • 28.
    Fear prophets ... and those prepared to die for the truth, for as a rule they make many others die with them, often before them, at times instead of them.
    (Umberto Eco (b. 1932), Italian semiologist, novelist. Brother William, in "Seventh Day: Night (2)," The Name of the Rose (1980, trans. 1983).)
    More quotations from: Umberto Eco, fear, truth
  • 29.
    It is strange that they will make ado when a man's body is buried, but not when he thus really and tragically dies, or seems to die.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, December 29, 1847, to Ralph Waldo Emerson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 146, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 30.
    '...ek strooi stadig en suinig my laaste bietjie bruin-suiker in die vallei langs jou linker-wang, `n paar sagte korrels in die droƫ rivierbedding onder jou regter-oog en die soet geur van swart koffie tussen jou harde lippe wat angstig wag...'
    More quotations from: Dieter Ian Maree
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