Quotations About / On: DYING

  • 31.
    Once the Xerox copier was invented, diplomacy died.
    (Andrew Young (b. 1932), U.S. politician, diplomat. Playboy (Chicago, July 1977).)
    More quotations from: Andrew Young
  • 32.
    A king should die on his feet.
    (Louis XVIII (1755-1824), French king. Alleged remark on his deathbed.)
    More quotations from: Louis XVIII
  • 33.
    The world is the mirror of myself dying.
    (Henry Miller (1891-1980), U.S. author. "Third or Fourth Day of Spring," Black Spring (1936).)
    More quotations from: Henry Miller, mirror, dying, world
  • 34.
    No young man ever thinks he shall die.
    (William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Fear of Death," (1821-1822).)
    More quotations from: William Hazlitt
  • 35.
    At ev'ry word a reputation dies.
    (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Rape of the Lock, cto. 3, l. 16 (1714).)
    More quotations from: Alexander Pope
  • 36.
    We die, because we live.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 178, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville
  • 37.
    Trust dies but mistrust blossoms.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Oedipus Colonus, l. 611.)
    More quotations from: Sophocles, trust
  • 38.
    We die of too much life.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 180, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Babbalanja, the philosopher.)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, life
  • 39.
    When a man dies he kicks the dust.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 75, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau refers here to the futility of accumulating possessions.)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 40.
    Man dies of cold, not of darkness.
    (Miguel de Unamuno (1864-1936), Spanish philosophical writer. The Tragic Sense of Life, ch. 4 (1913).)
    More quotations from: Miguel de Unamuno, cold
[Hata Bildir]