Quotations About / On: DYING

  • 31.
    Whoever has the luck to be born a character can laugh even at death. Because a character will never die! A man will die, a writer, the instrument of creation: but what he has created will never die!
    (Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936), Italian author, playwright. The Father, in Six Characters in Search of an Author, act 1 (1921).)
    More quotations from: Luigi Pirandello, death
  • 32.
    Think of the earth as a living organism that is being attacked by billions of bacteria whose numbers double every forty years. Either the host dies, or the virus dies, or both die.
    (Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. repr. In A View from the Diner's Club (1991). "Gods and Greens," Observer (London, August 27, 1989).)
    More quotations from: Gore Vidal
  • 33.
    Some women, when they kiss, blush, some call the cops, some swear, some bite, some laugh, some cry. Me? I die. Die. I die inside when you kiss me.
    (Samuel Fuller (b. 1911), U.S. screenwriter. Cuddles (Dolores Dorn), Underworld U.S.A. (1961).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Fuller, kiss, women
  • 34.
    I have heard a good many pretend that they are going to die; or that they have died, for aught that I know. Nonsense! I'll defy them to do it. They have n't got life enough in them.... Only half a dozen or so have died since the world began.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1859), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 435, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, world, life
  • 35.
    This event advertises me that there is such a fact as death,—the possibility of a man's dying. It seems as if no man had ever died in America before; for in order to die you must first have lived.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1859), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 434, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 36.
    To want fame is to prefer dying scorned than forgotten.
    (E.M. Cioran (b. 1911), Rumanian-born-French philosopher. "Strangled Thoughts," sct. 1, The New Gods (1969, trans. 1974).)
    More quotations from: E.M Cioran, fame, dying
  • 37.
    In America nothing dies easier than tradition.
    (Russell Baker (b. 1925), U.S. journalist. New York Times (May 14, 1991).)
    More quotations from: Russell Baker, america
  • 38.
    Live fast, die young and have a good-looking corpse.
    (Daniel Taradash, U.S. screenwriter, and John Monks, Jr., screenwriter. Nicholas Ray. Nick Romano (John Derek), in Knock On Any Door (film) (1949).)
    More quotations from: Daniel Taradash
  • 39.
    Once the Xerox copier was invented, diplomacy died.
    (Andrew Young (b. 1932), U.S. politician, diplomat. Playboy (Chicago, July 1977).)
    More quotations from: Andrew Young
  • 40.
    A king should die on his feet.
    (Louis XVIII (1755-1824), French king. Alleged remark on his deathbed.)
    More quotations from: Louis XVIII
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