Quotations About / On: EDUCATION

  • 71.
    Men do not believe in the power of education. We do not think we can speak to divine sentiments in man, and we do not try. We renounce all high aims.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 72.
    On every hand we observe a truly wise practice, in education, in morals, and in the arts of life, the embodied wisdom of many an ancient philosopher.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 129, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
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  • 73.
    We have not given science too big a place in our education, but we have made a perilous mistake in giving it too great a preponderance in method in every other branch of study.
    (Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Inaugural address, October 25, 1902, as president of Princeton University. The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 14, p. 170, ed. Arthur S. Link.)
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  • 74.
    The hardiest skeptic who has seen a horse broken, a pointer trained, or has visited a menagerie or the exhibition of the Industrious Fleas, will not deny the validity of education. "A boy," says Plato, "is the most vicious of all beasts;" and in the same spirit the old English poet Gascoigne says, "A boy is better unborn than untaught."
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
  • 75.
    There are words in that letter to his wife, respecting the education of his daughters, which deserve to be framed and hung over every mantelpiece in the land. Compare this earnest wisdom with that of Poor Richard.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Last Days of John Brown" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 447, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, education
  • 76.
    She gave high counsels. It was the privilege of certain boys to have this immeasurably high standard indicated to their childhood; a blessing which nothing else in education could supply.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Mary Moody Emerson," Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883, repr. 1904).)
  • 77.
    As for the graces of expression, a great thought is never found in a mean dress; but ... the nine Muses and the three Graces will have conspired to clothe it in fit phrase. Its education has always been liberal, and its implied wit can endow a college.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 109, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, education
  • 78.
    Man is endogenous, and education is his unfolding. The aid we have from others is mechanical, compared with the discoveries of nature in us. What is thus learned is delightful in the doing, and the effect remains.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Uses of Great Men," Representative Men (1850).)
  • 79.
    My father, at the death of his father, was but six years of age; and he grew up, literally without education.
    (Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).)
  • 80.
    There is a certain wisdom of humanity which is common to the greatest men with the lowest, and which our ordinary education often labors to silence and obstruct.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Over-Soul," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
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