Quotations About / On: EDUCATION

  • 71.
    The most general deficiency in our sort of culture and education is gradually dawning on me: no one learns, no one strives towards, no one teaches—enduring loneliness.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 3, p. 270, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Dawn, "Fifth Book," aphorism 443, "On Education," (1881).)
  • 72.
    Politics should share one purpose with religion: the steady emancipation of the individual through the education of his passions.
    (George F. Will (b. 1941), U.S. political columnist. Statecraft as Soulcraft: What Government Does, ch. 2 (1984).)
    More quotations from: George F Will, education
  • 73.
    The purpose of education is to keep a culture from being drowned in senseless repetitions, each of which claims to offer a new insight.
    (Harold Rosenberg (1906-1978), U.S. art critic, author. repr. As Discovering the Present, introduction (1973). "The Cultural Situation Today," Partisan Review (New Brunswick, New Jersey, Summer 1972).)
    More quotations from: Harold Rosenberg, culture, education
  • 74.
    Education is a crutch with which the foolish attack the wise to prove that they are not idiots.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian satirist. repr. In Thomas Szasz, Anti-Freud: Karl Kraus's Criticism of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry, ch. 8 (1976). Die Fackel (Vienna, November 7, 1912).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, education
  • 75.
    A comprehensive education is a well-stocked pharmacy: but we have no assurance that potassium cyanide will not be administered for a head cold.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, education, cold
  • 76.
    Whenever a youth is ascertained to possess talents meriting an education which his parents cannot afford, he should be carried forward at the public expense.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 439, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).)
    More quotations from: James Madison, education
  • 77.
    ... the whole tenour of female education ... tends to render the best disposed romantic and inconstant; and the remainder vain and mean.
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 4 (1792).)
  • 78.
    ... in the education of women, the cultivation of the understanding is always subordinate to the acquirement of some corporeal accomplishment ...
    (Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), British feminist. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, ch. 2 (1792).)
  • 79.
    At cheaper and nearer seats of Learning parents with slender incomes may place their sons in a course of education putting them on a level with the sons of the Richest.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 438, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).)
    More quotations from: James Madison, education
  • 80.
    I knew a man who carried his education in his vest pocket because there was more room there than in his head.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian writer. Trans. by Harry Zohn, originally published in Beim Wort genommen (1955). Half-Truths and One-and-a-Half Truths, University of Chicago Press (1990).)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, education
[Hata Bildir]