Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FAME

  • 21.
    Fame itself is but an epitaph; as late, as false, as true.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 178, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fame
  • 22.
    Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid.
    (Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, statesman. "Of Praise," The Essayes or Counsels (1625).)
    More quotations from: Francis Bacon, fame, river, light
  • 23.
    To be occasionally quoted is the only fame I care for.
    (Alexander Smith (1830-1867), Scottish poet. Dreamthorp, "Men of Letters," (1863).)
    More quotations from: Alexander Smith, fame
  • 24.
    Honor ... means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.
    (Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), German philosopher. Originally published in Parerga and Paralipomena, vol. 2 (1851). "The Wisdom of Life," Complete Essays of Schopenhauer, Crown (n.d.).)
    More quotations from: Arthur Schopenhauer, fame, lost
  • 25.
    Fame will go by and, so long, I've had you, fame. If it goes by, I've always known it was fickle. So at least it's something I experienced, but that's not where I live.
    (Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962), U.S. screen actor. Life (New York, Aug. 3, 1962). Conclusion of taped conversation published the day that Monroe died.)
    More quotations from: Marilyn Monroe, fame
  • 26.
    Great men, unknown to their generation, have their fame among the great who have preceded them, and all true worldly fame subsides from their high estimate beyond the stars.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 363, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fame
  • 27.
    The best people renounce all for one goal, the eternal fame of mortals; but most people stuff themselves like cattle.
    (Heraclitus (c. 535-475 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Diels-Kranz, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, 22B29. Heraclitus, one of the two or three most influential philosophers before Socrates, was known as "the riddler" or "the obscure.")
    More quotations from: Heraclitus, fame, people
  • 28.
    People feel fame gives them some kind of privilege to walk up to you and say anything to you, of any kind of nature—and it won't hurt your feelings—like it's happening to your clothing.
    (Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962), U.S. actor. As quoted in Ms. magazine, p. 40 (August 1972). Monroe was an extremely famous movie star and "sex symbol." She seemed to be very vulnerable emotionally; her early death was ruled a suicide.)
  • 29.
    I was going to get myself recognized at any price. ...If I could not win fame by goodness, I was ready to do it by badness. ...
    (Mary McCarthy (1912-1989), U.S. author. Memories of a Catholic Girlhood, ch. 5 (1957). On determining to distinguish herself when in the eighth grade of a convent school.)
    More quotations from: Mary McCarthy, fame
  • 30.
    Deathlessness should be arrived at in a ... haphazard fashion. Loving fame as much as any man, we shall carve our initials in the shell of a tortoise and turn him loose in a peat bog.
    (E.B. (Elwyn Brooks) White (1899-1985), U.S. author, editor. repr. in Writings from the New Yorker 1927-1976, ed. Rebecca M. Dale (1991). "Immortality," New Yorker (March 28, 1936).)
    More quotations from: E.B. (Elwyn Brooks) White, fame
[Hata Bildir]