Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FAME

  • 31.
    The journalists have constructed for themselves a little wooden chapel, which they also call the Temple of Fame, in which they put up and take down portraits all day long and make such a hammering you can't hear yourself speak.
    (G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook D," aph. 20, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).)
  • 32.
    Fame is no sanctuary from the passing of youth ... suicide is much easier and more acceptable in Hollywood than growing old gracefully.
    (Julie Burchill (b. 1960), British journalist, author. Girls on Film, ch. 3 (1986).)
    More quotations from: Julie Burchill, suicide, fame
  • 33.
    Stupid misery of fame and money. Always we were safe from it, mistaking our obscurity for a curse when it was a treasure. Free to make what we liked, to be ourselves, even do nothing at all. No one watching. We could be real.
    (Kate Millett (b. 1934), U.S. feminist theorist, literary critic, essayist, autobiographer, sculptor. Flying, pt. 1, Alfred A. Knopf (1974).)
    More quotations from: Kate Millett, fame, money
  • 34.
    He who is usually self-sufficient becomes exceptionally vain and keenly alive to fame and praise when he is physically ill. The more he loses himself the more he has to endeavor to regain his position by means of the opinion of others.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 329, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Human, All-Too-Human, part I, trans. by Helen Zimmern, in The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche, vol. 6, p. 367, ed. Oscar Levy, New York, Russell and Russell (1964). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 546, "Exceptionally Vain," (1878).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, fame
  • 35.
    Today one does not hear much about him.... The fame of his likes circulates briskly but soon grows heavy and stale; and as for history it will limit his life story to the dash between two dates.
    (Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Russian-born U.S. novelist, poet. "Spring in Filata," Nabokov's Dozen (1958). Of a writer in the story.)
  • 36.
    Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame—to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a Hell!
    (Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1873), British author, politician. The Last of the Barons, bk. 5, ch. 1 (1843).)
    More quotations from: Edward Bulwer-Lytton, fame, happy
  • 37.
    The love of fame is almost another name for the love of excellence; or it is the ambition to attain the highest excellence, sanctioned by the highest authority, that of time.
    (William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Different Sorts of Fame," The Round Table (1817).)
    More quotations from: William Hazlitt, fame, love, time
  • 38.
    The fame which is based on wealth or beauty is a frail and fleeting thing; but virtue shines for ages with undiminished lustre.
    (Gaius Sallustius Crispus (c. 86-35/34 B.C.), Roman historian. Catilina, I....)
  • 39.
    Mickey Mouse ... [is] always there—he's part of my life. That really is something not everyone can call their claim to fame.
    (Annette Funicello (b. 1942), U.S. entertainer. As quoted in the New York Times, sect. 9, p. 9 (November 21, 1993). Funicello was a child performer on the popular Mickey Mouse Club television show in the 1950s, wearing a cap with mock "mouse ears.")
    More quotations from: Annette Funicello, fame, life
  • 40.
    Those who write for lucre or fame are grosser Iscariots than the cartel robbers, for they steal the genius of the people, which is its will to resist evil.
    (Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "For Sale," Alms for Oblivion (1964).)
    More quotations from: Edward Dahlberg, fame, evil, people
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