Quotations About / On: FAME

  • 31.
    Happy is the man who hath never known what it is to taste of fame—to have it is a purgatory, to want it is a Hell!
    (Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1873), British author, politician. The Last of the Barons, bk. 5, ch. 1 (1843).)
    More quotations from: Edward Bulwer-Lytton, fame, happy
  • 32.
    The love of fame is almost another name for the love of excellence; or it is the ambition to attain the highest excellence, sanctioned by the highest authority, that of time.
    (William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Different Sorts of Fame," The Round Table (1817).)
    More quotations from: William Hazlitt, fame, love, time
  • 33.
    The fame which is based on wealth or beauty is a frail and fleeting thing; but virtue shines for ages with undiminished lustre.
    (Gaius Sallustius Crispus (c. 86-35/34 B.C.), Roman historian. Catilina, I....)
  • 34.
    The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death.
    (Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 158 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).)
    More quotations from: Blaise Pascal, fame, death
  • 35.
    Those who write for lucre or fame are grosser Iscariots than the cartel robbers, for they steal the genius of the people, which is its will to resist evil.
    (Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "For Sale," Alms for Oblivion (1964).)
    More quotations from: Edward Dahlberg, fame, evil, people
  • 36.
    Let the famous not denounce fame. Far from being empty and meaningless, it fills those it touches with divine power.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Sappho, in Sappho, act 1, sc. 5 (1819).)
  • 37.
    The reward of art is not fame or success but intoxication: that is why so many bad artists are unable to give it up.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 2 (1944, rev. 1951).)
    More quotations from: Cyril Connolly, fame, success
  • 38.
    Lust gratifies its flames in the chambers of the sacristans more often than in the houses of ill-fame.
    (Marcus Minucius Felix (2nd or 3rd cen. A.D.), Roman Christian apologist. Octavius, 25. 11, trans. by G.H. Rendell.)
    More quotations from: Marcus Minucius Felix, lust, fame
  • 39.
    The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison a more illustrious abode.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fame
  • 40.
    It is pitiful when a man bears a name for convenience merely, who has earned neither name nor fame.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 237, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, fame
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