Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: FAME

  • 41.
    Let the famous not denounce fame. Far from being empty and meaningless, it fills those it touches with divine power.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. Sappho, in Sappho, act 1, sc. 5 (1819).)
  • 42.
    Throughout my life, I have seen narrow-shouldered men, without a single exception, committing innumerable stupid acts, brutalizing their fellows and perverting souls by all means. They call the motive for their actions fame.
    (Isidore Ducasse, Comte de Lautréamont (1846-1870), French author, poet. Maldoror, bk. 1, ch. 5 (1870, trans. 1978).)
  • 43.
    O my countrymen!—be nice;Mbe cautious of your language;—and never, O! never let it be forgotten upon what small particles your eloquence and your fame depend.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760), vol. 2, ch. 6, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, fame
  • 44.
    The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom.
    (Sun Tzu (6th-5th century B.C.), Chinese general. The Art of War, ch. 10, axiom 24 (c. 490 B.C.), ed. James Clavell (1981).)
    More quotations from: Sun Tzu, jewel, fame
  • 45.
    The boys think they can all be athletes, and the girls think they can all be singers. That's the way to fame and success. ...as a group blacks must give up their illusions.
    (Kristin Hunter (b. 1931), African American author. Black Women Writers at Work, ch. 6, by Claudia Tate (1983).)
    More quotations from: Kristin Hunter, fame, success
  • 46.
    The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison a more illustrious abode.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, fame
  • 47.
    The Xanthus or Scamander is not a mere dry channel and bed of a mountain torrent, but fed by the ever-flowing springs of fame ... and I trust that I may be allowed to associate our muddy but much abused Concord River with the most famous in history.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 10, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 48.
    Men seek to be great; they would have offices, wealth, power, and fame. They think that to be great is to possess one side of nature,—the sweet, without the other side,—the bitter.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Compensation," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 49.
    Richard Burton is now my epitaph, my cross, my title, my image. I have achieved a kind of diabolical fame. It has nothing to do with my talents as an actor. That counts for little now. I am the diabolically famous Richard Burton.
    (Richard Burton (1925-1984), British stage and screen actor. Interview, 1963, ch. 21, quoted in Ruth Waterbury, Elizabeth Taylor (1964).)
    More quotations from: Richard Burton, fame
  • 50.
    Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame.
    (Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 45 (1816).)
    More quotations from: Jane Austen, fame, woman
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