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Quotations From AESCHYLUS

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  • 1.
    Relentless persuasion overbears him, irresistible child of forecounseling destruction.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 385.

    Read more quotations about / on: child
  • 2.
    For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another's happiness.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 834.

    Read more quotations about / on: sorrow, happiness, heart
  • 3.
    For there is no defense for a man who, in the excess of his wealth, has kicked the great altar of Justice out of sight.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 381.

    Read more quotations about / on: justice
  • 4.
    For he does not wish to seem but to be just.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 592.
  • 5.
    Alas for the affairs of men! When they are fortunate you might compare them to a shadow; and if they are unfortunate, a wet sponge with one dash wipes the picture away.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1327.
  • 6.
    The evils of mortals are manifold; nowhere is trouble of the same wing seen.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 327.
  • 7.
    When a tongue fails to send forth appropriate shafts, there might be a word to act as healer of these.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 446.
  • 8.
    Ares, gold-changer of bodies.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 438.
  • 9.
    Bonds and the pangs of hunger are excellent prophet doctors for the wits.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1621.
  • 10.
    The field of doom bears death as its harvest.
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 601.

    Read more quotations about / on: death
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