Quotations From ANDREW JACKSON

» More about Andrew Jackson on Poemhunter

 

  • The President is the direct representative of the American people ... [and is] elected by the people and responsible to them.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Protest message to the Senate, April 15, 1834. Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, vol. II, ed. J.D. Richardson, Washington (1908).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Veto of the Second National Bank, July 10, 1832. Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, vol. II, ed. J.D. Richardson, Washington (1908).
  • The Constitution and the laws are supreme and the Union indissoluble.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Message to Congress, January 16, 1833. Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, vol. II, ed. J.D. Richardson, Washington (1908).
  • What disgraceful scenes in Congress. Is Mr. Adams demented, or is he perversely wicked? Both, I think, and Adams ought to be confined to a hospital.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Letter, February 27, 1842, to William B. Lewis, Jackson-Lewis Papers, New York Public Library.
  • The hydra of corruption is only scotched, not dead. An investigation kills and it and its supporters dead. Let this be had.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Letter, December 16, 1832, to Congressman James K. Polk, following Jackson's reelection as president. Jackson is referring to the Bank of the United States.
  • The people are the government, administering it by their agents; they are the government, the sovereign power.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Letter, August 19, 1841, to William B. Lewis, Jackson-Lewis Papers, New York Public Library.

    Read more quotations about / on: power, people
  • The safety of the republic being the supreme law, and Texas having offered us the key to the safety of our country from all foreign intrigues and diplomacy, I say accept the key ... and bolt the door at once.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Letter, [1844], to Francis P. Blair, Jackson Papers, Library of Congress.
  • I am fearful that the paper system ... will ruin the state. Its demoralizing effects are already seen and spoken of everywhere ... I therefore protest against receiving any of that trash.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Correspondence, letter, September 3, 1821, to Captain John Donelson, III, 117.
  • This spirit of mob-law is becoming as great an evil as a servile war.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Correspondence, letter, August 9, 1835, to Amos Kendall, V, 360. The Charleston post office had been attacked by a mob protesting the delivery there of abolitionist literature.

    Read more quotations about / on: evil, war
  • Although I could lament in the language and feelings of David for Absalom, I am constrained to say, peace to his manes. Let us weep for the living, and not for the dead.
    Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. president. Correspondence, letter, April 29, 1833, to William B. Lewis, V, 66. Jackson's reply on learning of the death of his friend Judge John Overton.

    Read more quotations about / on: peace
[Hata Bildir]