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Quotations From ANGELINA GRIMKÉ

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  • 1.
    We Abolition Women are turning the world upside down.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 1, by Gerda Lerner (1967). Said on February 25, 1838.

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  • 2.
    The nation is in a death-struggle. It must either become one vast slaveocracy of petty tyrants, or wholly the land of the free.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 19, by Gerda Lerner (1967). From a paper read on May 14, 1863, at the final session of a convention of Northern women which was held to discuss how women might aid the Union effort.

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  • 3.
    Our fathers waged a bloody conflict with England, because they were taxed without being represented. This is just what unmarried women of property are now.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. Letters to Catherine Beecher, letter #11 (1837). In a letter dated August 28, 1837, pointing out that because women were not permitted to vote, the single woman property- owner, with not even an indirect say (through possible influence on a husband's vote) in property tax policy, had no say at all.

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  • 4.
    Can you not see that women could do and would do a hundred times more for the slave, if she were not fettered?
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 12, by Gerda Lerner (1967). Said in 1837.

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  • 5.
    One who is a slaveholder at heart never recognizes a human being in a slave.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist. As quoted in American Slavery As It Is, by Theodore D. Weld (1839). Said on April 6, 1839. The daughters of a South Carolina slaveholding family, Angelina and her sister Sarah had moved north to escape the presence of the slave system and become active abolitionists.

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  • 6.
    Thou art blind to the danger of marrying a woman who feels and acts out the principle of equal rights.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. letter, Feb. 1838, to abolitionist Theodore Dwight Weld. Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld, and Sarah Grimké, 1822-1844, vol. 2, eds. Gilbert H. Barnes and Dwight L. Dumond (1934).

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  • 7.
    I have not placed reading before praying because I regard it more important, but because, in order to pray aright, we must understand what we are praying for.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. repr. In The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820-1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," Anti-Slavery Examiner (September 1836).
  • 8.
    Women ought to feel a peculiar sympathy in the colored man's wrong, for, like him, she has been accused of mental inferiority, and denied the privileges of a liberal education.
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 10, by Gerda Lerner (1967). From a paper prepared for a May 1837 antislavery convention of women. Grimke, the daughter of a South Carolina slaveowner, had severed relations with her family and moved North.

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  • 9.
    I recognize no rights but human rights—I know nothing of men's rights and women's rights ...
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, suffragist, feminist, and author. Letters to Catherine E. Beecher, Letter no. 12 (1838). From a letter dated October 2, 1837. Beecher, a prominent educator of women, was an anti-suffragist.

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