Quotations From ARISTOTLE

» More about Aristotle on Poemhunter

 

  • 1.
    Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and choice, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nichomachean Ethics I.1: 1094a1-3, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984). The opening line of Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics.
  • 2.
    For one swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, does not make a man blessed and happy.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nichomachean Ethics I.7: 1098a18-19, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984). An important qualification of Aristotle's definition of happiness.

    Read more quotations about / on: summer, happy, time
  • 3.
    For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Metaphysics II.1: 993b10-11, trans. by W.D. Ross; Metaphysics II.1: 993a27-993b7, Complete Works of Aristotle, trans. by W.D. Ross, ed. Jonathan Barnes, Princeton University Press (1984).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • 4.
    All men by nature desire knowledge.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Metaphysics, bk. 1, ch. 1.

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • 5.
    God and nature do nothing in vain.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 1, ch. 2. De Caelo, book 1, chapter 4. One expression of the author's thoroughgoing teleological outlook.

    Read more quotations about / on: nature, god
  • 6.
    If happiness, then, is activity expressing virtue, it is reasonable for it to express the supreme virtue, which will be the virtue of the best thing.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Nicomachean Ethics, bk. 10, ch. 7, trans. by Terence Irwin (1985).

    Read more quotations about / on: happiness
  • 7.
    So it is naturally with the male and the female; the one is superior, the other inferior; the one governs, the other is governed; and the same rule must necessarily hold good with respect to all mankind.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 1, ch. 5, sct. 1254b.

    Read more quotations about / on: respect
  • 8.
    Man is by nature a political animal.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 1, ch. 2, sct. 1253a (c. 343 B.C.).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal, nature
  • 9.
    For as the interposition of a rivulet, however small, will occasion the line of the phalanx to fluctuate, so any trifling disagreement will be the cause of seditions; but they will not so soon flow from anything else as from the disagreement between virtue and vice, and next to that between poverty and riches.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 5, ch. 3, sct. 1303b (c. 343 B.C.).

    Read more quotations about / on: poverty
  • 10.
    Governments which have a regard to the common interest are constituted in accordance with strict principles of justice, and are therefore true forms; but those which regard only the interest of the rulers are all defective and perverted forms, for they are despotic, whereas a state is a community of freemen.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. III, ch. 6, l.17, The Basic Works of Aristotle, ed. Richard McKeon, Random House, Inc. (1941).

    Read more quotations about / on: justice
[Hata Bildir]