Treasure Island

Quotations From BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

» More about Benjamin Franklin on Poemhunter

 

  • 11.
    Where there's marriage without love, there will be love without marriage.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Poor Richard's Almanac, May (1734).

    Read more quotations about / on: marriage, love
  • 12.
    At twenty years of age, the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Poor Richard's Almanac, June (1741).
  • 13.
    Opportunity is the great bawd.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Poor Richard's Almanac, September (1735).
  • 14.
    That which resembles most living one's life over again, seems to be to recall all the circumstances of it; and, to render this remembrance more durable, to record them in writing.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 1 (1868).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 15.
    Ça ira. (It will go its own way.)
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Attributed. Said about the American Revolution while Franklin was in Paris 1776-1777. The remark was popularized and made the refrain of a revolutionary song—the Carillon National—by Ladré during the French Revolution of 1789.
  • 16.
    Those disputing, contradicting, and confuting people are generally unfortunate in their affairs. They get victory, sometimes, but they never get good will, which would be of more use to them.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 9 (1868). Written 1771-1790. Earlier in his autobiography (ch. 1), describing his own "disputatious turn" when younger, a habit he had picked up from reading his father's books, Franklin observed, "Persons of good sense ... seldom fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and, generally, men of all sorts who have been bred at Edinburgh."

    Read more quotations about / on: sometimes, people
  • 17.
    A benevolent man should allow a few faults in himself, to keep his friends in countenance.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 6 (written 1771-1790, publ. 1868).
  • 18.
    Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. letter, Nov. 13, 1789. Complete Works, vol. 10, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).

    Read more quotations about / on: death, world
  • 19.
    There never was a good war or a bad peace.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Letter, July 27, 1783, to the botanist Sir Joseph Banks. Complete Works, vol. 8, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888). Franklin used the same words in a letter of Sept. 11, 1783, to New England revolutionary Josiah Quincy.

    Read more quotations about / on: peace, war
[Hata Bildir]