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Quotations From CHARLES BAUDELAIRE

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  • 21.
    Hypocrite reader—my fellow—my brother!
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Les Fleurs du Mal, preface (1857).

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  • 22.
    Multitude, solitude: equal and interchangeable terms for the active and prolific poet.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "Crowds," (1861).

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  • 23.
    All which is beautiful and noble is the result of reason and calculation.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, XI "In Praise of Cosmetics," (1863).

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  • 24.
    My soul travels on the smell of perfume like the souls of other men on music.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "A Hemisphere in a Head of Hair," (1857).

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  • 25.
    The idea which man forms of beauty imprints itself throughout his attire, rumples or stiffens his garments, rounds off or aligns his gestures, and, finally, even subtly penetrates the features of his face.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, I "Beauty, Fashion, and Happiness," (1863).

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  • 26.
    It is from the womb of art that criticism was born.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1846," sct. 1, published in Curiosités Esthétiques (1868).
  • 27.
    To be just, that is to say, to justify its existence, criticism should be partial, passionate and political, that is to say, written from an exclusive point of view, but a point of view that opens up the widest horizons.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1846," sct. 1, published in Curiosités Esthétiques (1868).
  • 28.
    There are as many kinds of beauty as there are habitual ways of seeking happiness.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1846," sct. 2, Curiosités Esthétiques (1868). Baudelaire may have been recalling a footnote in ch. 110 of Stendhal's Histoire de la Peinture en Italie: "La beauté est l'expression d'une certaine manière habituelle de chercher le bonheur."

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  • 29.
    To say the word Romanticism is to say modern art—that is, intimacy, spirituality, color, aspiration towards the infinite, expressed by every means available to the arts.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1846," sct. 2, Curiosités Esthétiques (1868). "Romanticism," Baudelaire judged, "is the most recent, the most contemporary expression of beauty."

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  • 30.
    Any newspaper, from the first line to the last, is nothing but a web of horrors.... I cannot understand how an innocent hand can touch a newspaper without convulsing in disgust.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, LIX (1887).
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