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Quotations From CHARLES BAUDELAIRE

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  • 81.
    In philosophical inquiry, the human spirit, imitating the movement of the stars, must follow a curve which brings it back to its point of departure. To conclude is to close a circle.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Artificial Paradise, The Poem of Haschish, V. Moral (1860).
  • 82.
    How little remains of the man I once was, save the memory of him! But remembering is only a new form of suffering.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Samuel Cramer, in La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.

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  • 83.
    The life of our city is rich in poetic and marvelous subjects. We are enveloped and steeped as though in an atmosphere of the marvelous; but we do not notice it.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1846," sct. 18, published in Curiosités Esthétiques (1868).

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  • 84.
    The cannon thunders ... limbs fly in all directions ... one can hear the groans of victims and the howling of those performing the sacrifice ... it's Humanity in search of happiness.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. "Plans and Notes: For Civil War," appendix to Prose Poems, published in Complete Works, vol. 1, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Yves-Gérard le Dantec, rev. by Claude Pichois (1953).

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  • 85.
    Poetry has no goal other than itself; it can have no other, and no poem will be so great, so noble, so truly worthy of the name of poem, than one written uniquely for the pleasure of writing a poem.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. "New Notes on Edgar Poe," part IV (1859).

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  • 86.
    Poetry and progress are like two ambitious men who hate one another with an instinctive hatred, and when they meet upon the same road, one of them has to give place.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1859," sect. 2, Curiosités Esthétiques (1868).

    Read more quotations about / on: hate, poetry
  • 87.
    Common sense tells us that the things of the earth exist only a little, and that true reality is only in dreams.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Artificial Paradise, dedication (1860).
  • 88.
    The whole visible universe is but a storehouse of images and signs to which the imagination will give a relative place and value; it is a sort of pasture which the imagination must digest and transform.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In The Mirror of Art, ed. Jonathan Mayne (1955). "Salon of 1859," sct. 3, Curiosités Esthétiques (1868).

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  • 89.
    The poet enjoys the incomparable privilege of being able to be himself and others, as he wishes.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "Crowds," (1861).
  • 90.
    But what does an eternity of damnation matter to one who has found for one second the infinity of pleasure?
    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "The Bad Glazier," (1862).
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