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Quotations From CHARLES DICKENS


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  • I never see any difference in boys. I only know two sorts of boys. Mealy boys and beef-faced boys.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Mr. Grimwig, in Oliver Twist, ch. 14 (1838).
  • A bill... is the most extraordinary locomotive engine that the genius of man ever produced. It would keep on running during the longest lifetime, without ever once stopping of its own accord.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Pickwick Papers, ch. 32, p. 434 (1837).

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  • A man in public life expects to be sneered at—it is the fault of his elevated sitiwation, and not of himself.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Mr. Kenwigs, in Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 14 (1838-39).

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  • Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Tigg, in Martin Chuzzlewit, ch. 27 (1844).

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  • Keep out of Chancery.... It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Mr. Krook reporting Tom Jarndyce, in Bleak House, ch. 5 (1852).

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  • "Poetry's unnat'ral; no man ever talked poetry 'cept a beadle on boxin' day, or Warren's blackin' or Rowland's oil, or some o' them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry, my boy."
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Tony Weller in The Pickwick Papers, ch. 33, p. 452 (1837). The elder Weller, commenting on his son's composition of a valentine.

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  • Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 12, p. 93 (1841).

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  • It was as true as taxes is. And nothing's truer than them.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Mr. Barkis, in David Copperfield, ch. 21 (1849-1850). This remark echoes Benjamin Franklin's famous gloomy observation on the inevitability of taxes (Franklin on certainty).
  • Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 12, p. 93 (1841).

    Read more quotations about / on: pride, happy, together, child
  • We are so very 'umble.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Uriah Heep, in David Copperfield, ch. 17 (1849-1850).
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