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Quotations From CHARLES DICKENS

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  • 31.
    It is a pleasant thing to reflect upon, and furnishes a complete answer to those who contend for the gradual degeneration of the human species, that every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 36 (1838-1839).

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  • 32.
    Quadruped lions are said to be savage, only when they are hungry; biped lions are rarely sulky longer than when their appetite for distinction remains unappeased.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 15, p. 179 (1839).
  • 33.
    That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 18, 218 (1839).

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  • 34.
    Although a skillful flatterer is a most delightful companion if him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 28, 362 (1839).

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  • 35.
    It was not exactly a hairdresser's; that is to say, people of a coarse and vulgar turn of mind might have called it a barber's; for they not only cut and curled ladies elegantly, and children carefully, but shaved gentlemen easily.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch.52, p. 684 (1839).

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  • 36.
    It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Sydney Carton in A Tale of Two Cities, Part 3, ch. 15, p. 15 (1859). His last reflections before he is guillotined.
  • 37.
    Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Martin Chuzzlewit, ch. 35 (1844).

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  • 38.
    ... one of those fortunate men who, if they were to dive under one side of a barge stark-naked, would come up on the other with a new suit of clothes on, and a ticket for soup in the waistcoat-pocket.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Sketches by Boz, ch. 7, p. 25 (1836).
  • 39.
    The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Sketches by Boz, ch. 5, p. 29 (1836).

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  • 40.
    Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Dick Swiveller, in The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 7 (1841).
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