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Quotations From CHARLES DICKENS

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  • There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 10 (1838). Referring to chasing pickpockets.

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  • Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Oliver Twist, ch. 37, p. 267 (1838).

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  • A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. A Tale of Two Cities, bk. 1, ch. 3 (1859).
  • It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Quoted in Fred Kaplan, Dickens: A Biography, ch. 11 (1988). Referring to reading in public.

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  • No man ever walked down to posterity with so small a book under his arm.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Quoted in Hesketh Pearson, Dickens, ch. 20 (1949). Of poet Thomas Gray.
  • "Avay with melincholly, as the little boy said ven his school-missis died.'
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Sam Weller in The Pickwick Papers, ch. 44, p. 623 (1837).

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  • One of the many to whom, from straightened circumstances, a consequent inability to form the associations they would wish, and a disinclination to mix with the society they could obtain, London is as complete a solitude as the plains of Syria.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 20, p. 246 (1839).

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  • Gold conjures up a mist about a man, more destructive of all his old senses and lulling to his feelings than the fumes of charcoal.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 1, p. 4 (1839).
  • I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. repr. In All the Year Round (1860). The narrator (Mr. Sampson), in Hunted Down, ch. 2, New York Ledger (1859).

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  • The very dogs were all asleep, and the flies, drunk with moist sugar in the grocer's shop, forgot their wings and briskness, and baked to death in dusty corners of the window.
    Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. The Old Curiosity Shop, ch. 27, p. 209 (1841).

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