Quotations From CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER


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  • What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it.
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. essayist, novelist. "Third Week," My Summer in a Garden (1871).
  • It is fortunate that each generation does not comprehend its own ignorance. We are thus enabled to call our ancestors barbarous.
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. editor, author. "Second Study," Backlog Studies (1873).
  • Mud-pies gratify one of our first and best instincts. So long as we are dirty, we are pure.
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. author. "Preliminary," My Summer in a Garden (1817).
  • Lettuce is like conversation: it must be fresh and crisp, and so sparkling that you scarcely notice the bitter in it.
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1901), U.S. author. My Summer in a Garden (1870).
  • Politics makes strange bed-fellows.
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. editor, author. "Fifteenth Week," My Summer in a Garden (1871).
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