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Quotations From CHARLES HORTON COOLEY

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  • 11.
    The need to exert power, when thwarted in the open fields of life, is the more likely to assert itself in trifles.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

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  • 12.
    We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

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  • 13.
    When we hate a person, with an intimate, imaginative, human hatred, we enter into his mind, or sympathize—any strong interest will arouse the imagination and create some sort of sympathy.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).

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  • 14.
    Each man must have his "I;" it is more necessary to him than bread; and if he does not find scope for it within the existing institutions he will be likely to make trouble.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • 15.
    A man may lack everything but tact and conviction and still be a forcible speaker; but without these nothing will avail.... Fluency, grace, logical order, and the like, are merely the decorative surface of oratory.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • 16.
    The idea that seeing life means going from place to place and doing a great variety of obvious things is an illusion natural to dull minds.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 17.
    There is hardly any one so insignificant that he does not seem imposing to some one at some time.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).

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  • 18.
    So far as discipline is concerned, freedom means not its absence but the use of higher and more rational forms as contrasted with those that are lower or less rational.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).

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  • 19.
    Could anything be more indicative of a slight but general insanity than the aspect of the crowd on the streets of Chicago?
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 2 (1902).

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  • 20.
    There is nothing less to our credit than our neglect of the foreigner and his children, unless it be the arrogance most of us betray when we set out to "americanize" him.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: children
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