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Quotations From CHARLES HORTON COOLEY

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  • 21.
    The mind is not a hermit's cell, but a place of hospitality and intercourse.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).
  • 22.
    By recognizing a favorable opinion of yourself, and taking pleasure in it, you in a measure give yourself and your peace of mind into the keeping of another, of whose attitude you can never be certain. You have a new source of doubt and apprehension.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).

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  • 23.
    The bashful are always aggressive at heart.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

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  • 24.
    The more developed sexual passion, in both sexes, is very largely an emotion of power, domination, or appropriation. There is no state of feeling that says "mine, mine," more fiercely.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

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  • 25.
    To retire to the monastery, or the woods, or the sea, is to escape from the sharp suggestions that spur on ambition.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).

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  • 26.
    To cease to admire is a proof of deterioration.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • 27.
    A strange and somewhat impassive physiognomy is often, perhaps, an advantage to an orator, or leader of any sort, because it helps to fix the eye and fascinate the mind.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • 28.
    If we divine a discrepancy between a man's words and his character, the whole impression of him becomes broken and painful; he revolts the imagination by his lack of unity, and even the good in him is hardly accepted.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).

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  • 29.
    Every general increase of freedom is accompanied by some degeneracy, attributable to the same causes as the freedom.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).

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  • 30.
    No matter what a man does, he is not fully sane or human unless there is a spirit of freedom in him, a soul unconfined by purpose and larger than the practicable world.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: freedom, world
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