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Quotations From CHARLES HORTON COOLEY

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  • 31.
    Kindliness seems to exist primarily as an animal instinct, so deeply rooted that mental degeneracy, which works from the top down, does not destroy it until the mind sinks to the lower grades of idiocy.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal
  • 32.
    We are born to action; and whatever is capable of suggesting and guiding action has power over us from the first.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).

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  • 33.
    If love closes, the self contracts and hardens: the mind having nothing else to occupy its attention and give it that change and renewal it requires, busies itself more and more with self-feeling, which takes on narrow and disgusting forms, like avarice, arrogance and fatuity.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: change, love
  • 34.
    We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

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  • 35.
    "I" is a militant social tendency, working to hold and enlarge its place in the general current of tendencies. So far as it can it waxes, as all life does. To think of it as apart from society is a palpable absurdity of which no one could be guilty who really saw it as a fact of life.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 36.
    The imaginations which people have of one another are the solid facts of society.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).

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  • 37.
    Institutions—government, churches, industries, and the like—have properly no other function than to contribute to human freedom; and in so far as they fail, on the whole, to perform this function, they are wrong and need reconstruction.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).

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  • 38.
    The chief misery of the decline of the faculties, and a main cause of the irritability that often goes with it, is evidently the isolation, the lack of customary appreciation and influence, which only the rarest tact and thoughtfulness on the part of others can alleviate.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).

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  • 39.
    As social beings we live with our eyes upon our reflection, but have no assurance of the tranquillity of the waters in which we see it.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
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