Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 101.
    One sheds one's sicknesses in books—repeats and presents again one's emotions, to be master of them.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, p. 150, letter, Oct. 17, 1913, to A.W. McLeod, Heinemann (1932).
  • 102.
    I will wait and watch till the day of David at last shall be finished, and wisdom no more fox-faced, and the blood gets back its flame.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published in 1926. David, scene 14, The Complete Plays of D. H. Lawrence, Viking Press (1966). Characters are biblical; Jonathan is speaking.
  • 103.
    The goal is to know how not-to-know.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1923). "Dana's 'Two Years before the Mast'," Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 9, Doubleday (1959).
  • 104.
    The deadly Hydra now is the hydra of Equality. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity is the three-fanged serpent.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Letter, July 16, 1915, to philosopher Bertrand Russell. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 2, eds. George J. Zytaruk and James T. Boulton (1981).
  • 105.
    Homer was wrong in saying, "Would that strife might pass away from among gods and men!" He did not see that he was praying for the destruction of the universe.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Notes for Birds, Beasts, and Flowers," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 67, Viking Press (1936).
  • 106.
    Oh literature, oh the glorious Art, how it preys upon the marrow in our bones. It scoops the stuffing out of us, and chucks us aside. Alas!
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Letter, June 10, 1912, to poet and author Walter De La Mare. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton, 1979).
  • 107.
    Men always do leave off really thinking, when the last bit of wild animal dies in them.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1925). St. Mawr, p. 50, Vintage Books (1959).

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  • 108.
    Be still when you have nothing to say; when genuine passion moves you, say what you've got to say, and say it hot.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 2 (1924).

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  • 109.
    The love between man and woman is the greatest and most complete passion the world will ever see, because it is dual, because it is of two opposing kinds.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Love," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 153, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 110.
    The horse, the horse! The symbol of surging potency and power of movement, of action, in man.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Apocalypse, ch. 10 (1931).

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