Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 111.
    Not that the Red Indian will ever possess the broad lands of America. At least I presume not. But his ghost will.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 4 (1924).

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  • 112.
    Whatever men you take, keep the idea of man intact: let your soul wait whether your body does or not.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Married Man, act II, The Complete Plays of D. H. Lawrence, Viking Press (1966). Brentnall advising Annie.
  • 113.
    If you believe in your own sex, and won't have it done dirt to: they'll down you. It's the one insane taboo left: sex as a natural and vital thing.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 17, Bantam Books (1980). Duncan Forbes is speaking.

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  • 114.
    And this is the real point of [Lady Chatterley's Lover]. I want men and women to be able to think sex, fully, completely, honestly, and cleanly.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Published by Mandrake Press (1930). A Propos of "Lady Chatterley's Lover," Bantam Books (1980).

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  • 115.
    Life is a travelling to the edge of knowledge, then a leap taken.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "The Crown," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).

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  • 116.
    Don't be on the side of the angels, it's too lowering.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, p. 695, letter, Dec. 18, 1927, to Rolf Gardiner, Heinemann (1932).
  • 117.
    The real tragedy of England, as I see it, is the tragedy of ugliness. The country is so lovely: the man-made England is so vile.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Nottingham and Mining Countryside," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 137, Viking Press (1936).
  • 118.
    Have you built your ship of death, O have you?
    O build your ship of death, for you will need it.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British poet. The Ship of Death (l. 8-9). . . The Complete Poems [D. H. Lawrence]. Vivian de Sola Pinto and Warren Roberts, eds. (1993) Penguin Books.

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  • 119.
    The house came to be haunted by the unspoken phrase: There must be more money! There must be more money!
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by T. Seltzer (1928). "The Rocking-Horse Winner," The Tales of D. H. Lawrence, M. Secker (1934).

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  • 120.
    Without secrecy there would be no pornography. But secrecy and modesty are two utterly different things.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Faber & Faber (1929). "Pornography and Obscenity," Sex, Literature, and Censorship, Twayne Publishers (1953).
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