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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 11.
    With a woman, a man always wants to let himself go. And it is precisely with a woman that he should never let himself go ... but stick to his innermost belief and meet her just there.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 18, Vintage Books (1951). Don Ramon is speaking.

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  • 12.
    Where is the source of all money-sickness, and the origin of all sex-perversion?.... It lies in the heart of man, and not in the conditions.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Study of Thomas Hardy," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 406, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 13.
    It was sex, but the greater, not the lesser sex. The waters over the earth wheeling upon the waters under the earth, like an eagle silently wheeling above its own shadow.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Knopf (1926). The Plumed Serpent, ch. 7, Vintage Books (1951).
  • 14.
    The weakness of modern tragedy ... [is that] transgression against the social code is made to bring destruction, as though the social code worked our irrevocable fate.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Study of Thomas Hardy," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 420, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 15.
    The novel is the highest form of human expression so far attained. Why? Because it is so incapable of the absolute.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "The Novel," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).
  • 16.
    I believe in being warm-hearted. I believe especially in fucking with a warm heart.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 14, Bantam Books (1980). Oliver Mellors (the novel's hero) is speaking.

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  • 17.
    And this is the final meaning of work: the extension of human consciousness. The lesser meaning of work is the achieving of self-preservation.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Study of Thomas Hardy," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 430, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 18.
    In every great novel, who is the hero all the time? Not any of the characters, but some unnamed and nameless flame behind them all.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "The Novel," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).

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  • 19.
    Ours is essentially a tragic age, so we refuse to take it tragically.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 1 (written 1928, published 1959). Opening words.
  • 20.
    Let there be an end ... of all this welter of pity, which is only self-pity reflected onto some obvious surface.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Study of Thomas Hardy," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 407, Viking Press (1936).
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