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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 21.
    Any novel of importance has a purpose. If only the "purpose" be large enough, and not at outs with the passional inspiration.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by Centaur Press (Philadelphia, 1925). "The Novel," Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine, M. Secker (1934).

    Read more quotations about / on: inspiration
  • 22.
    Real knowledge comes out of the whole corpus of consciousness; out of your belly and your penis as much as out of your brain and mind. The mind can only analyze and rationalise.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 4, Bantam Books (1980). Tommy Dukes is speaking.
  • 23.
    You'll never succeed in idealizing hard work. Before you can dig mother earth you've got to take off your ideal jacket. The harder a man works, at brute labour, the thinner becomes his idealism, the darker his mind.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 8 (1924).

    Read more quotations about / on: mother, work
  • 24.
    A great deal of us is together, and we can but abide by it, and steer our courses to meet soon. John Thomas says goodnight to Lady Jane, a little droopingly, but with hopeful heart.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 20, Bantam Books (1980). Connie is speaking to Mellors.

    Read more quotations about / on: together, heart
  • 25.
    And what's romance? Usually, a nice little tale where you have everything As You Like It, where rain never wets your jacket and gnats never bite your nose and it's always daisy-time.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 7 (1924).

    Read more quotations about / on: romance, rain, time
  • 26.
    All the great words, it seemed to Connie, were cancelled for her generation: love, joy, happiness, home, mother, father, husband, all these great, dynamic words were half dead now, and dying from day to day.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Privately printed in Florence (1928). Lady Chatterley's Lover, ch. 6, Bantam Books (1980). Connie Chatterley is the novel's heroine.

    Read more quotations about / on: husband, dying, happiness, joy, father, mother, home, love
  • 27.
    To place absolute trust on another human being is in itself a disaster, both ways, since each human being is a ship that must sail its own course, even if it go in company with another ship.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1923). Kangaroo, ch. 11, Viking Compass (1951).

    Read more quotations about / on: trust
  • 28.
    Men and women should stay apart, till their hearts grow gentle towards one another again.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1925). St. Mawr, p. 120, Vintage Books (1959).

    Read more quotations about / on: stay, women
  • 29.
    Towns oftener swamp one than carry one out onto the big ocean of life.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Dec. 2, 1908. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton (1979).

    Read more quotations about / on: ocean, life
  • 30.
    The day of the absolute is over, and we're in for the strange gods once more.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1923). Kangaroo, ch. 8, Viking Compass (1951).
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