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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 51.
    You will not easily get a man to believe that his carnal love for the woman he has made his wife is as high a love as that he felt for his mother or sister.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1922). Fantasia of the Unconscious, ch. 10, Viking Compass (1960).

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  • 52.
    Comes over one an absolute necessity to move. And what is more, to move in some particular direction. A double necessity then: to get on the move, and to know whither.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Sea and Sardinia (1923). Opening words.
  • 53.
    The one woman who never gives herself is your free woman, who is always giving herself.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Sept. 2, 1922. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, eds. James T. Boulton, E. Mansfield, and W. Roberts (1987).

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  • 54.
    Poor devil, poor devil, he's best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking-horse to find a winner.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. First published by T. Seltzer (1928). "The Rocking-Horse Winner," The Tales of D. H. Lawrence, M. Secker (1934). Uncle Oscar commenting on Master Paul at the end of the story.

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  • 55.
    Only the flow matters; live and let live, love and let love. There is no point to love.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Do Women Change?" Assorted Articles, M. Secker (1930).

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  • 56.
    Men are freest when they are most unconscious of freedom. The shout is a rattling of chains, always was.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1923). "The Spirit of Place," Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 1, Doubleday (1959).

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  • 57.
    To the Puritan, all things are impure, as somebody says.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Etruscan Places, "Cerveteri," (written 1927, published 1932). Lawrence was probably thinking of St. Paul's words in the New Testament: "Unto the pure all things are pure." (Titus 1:15).
  • 58.
    The essential function of art is moral.... But a passionate, implicit morality, not didactic. A morality which changes the blood, rather than the mind.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1923). "Whitman," Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 12, Doubleday (1959).
  • 59.
    Sight is the least sensual of all the senses. And we strain ourselves to see, see, see—everything, everything through the eye, in one mode of objective curiosity.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1922). Fantasia of the Unconscious, ch. 5, Viking Compass (1960).
  • 60.
    A man has no religion who has not slowly and painfully gathered one together, adding to it, shaping it; and one's religion is never complete and final, it seems, but must always be undergoing modification.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Dec. 3, 1907. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton (1979). Lawrence added, "So I contend that true Socialism is religion; that honest, fervent politics are religion; that whatever a man will labour for earnestly and in some measure unselfishly is religion."

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