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Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

» More about D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence on Poemhunter

 

  • 71.
    I think we ought to be able to alter the whole system—but not by bullying, not because one lot wants what the other has got.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published in 1920. Touch and Go, scene 2, The Complete Plays of D. H. Lawrence, Viking Press (1966). Gerald is speaking.
  • 72.
    The human being is a most curious creature. He thinks he has got one soul, and he has got dozens.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Sea and Sardinia, ch. 8 (1923).
  • 73.
    The human consciousness is really homogeneous. There is no complete forgetting, even in death.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.

    Read more quotations about / on: death
  • 74.
    In the end, for congenial sympathy, for poetry, for work, for original feeling and expression, for perfect companionship with one's friends—give me the country.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Feb. 28, 1909. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 1, ed. James T. Boulton (1979).

    Read more quotations about / on: sympathy, perfect, poetry, work
  • 75.
    It is so much more difficult to live with one's body than with one's soul. One's body is so much more exacting: what it won't have it won't have, and nothing can make bitter into sweet.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Oct. 31, 1913. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, vol. 2, eds. George J. Zytaruk and James T. Boulton (1981).
  • 76.
    The Moon! Artemis! the great goddess of the splendid past of men! Are you going to tell me she is a dead lump?
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse, by Frederick Carter," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 300, Viking Press (1936).

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  • 77.
    We need not feel ashamed of flirting with the zodiac. The zodiac is well worth flirting with.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E. McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction. Lawrence's approval of astrology, however, excluded "the rather silly modern way of horoscopy and telling your fortune by the stars." His interest lay in the study of the stars as myth and metaphor.
  • 78.
    Myth is an attempt to narrate a whole human experience, of which the purpose is too deep, going too deep in the blood and soul, for mental explanation or description.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E. McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.
  • 79.
    You mustn't look in my novel for the old stable ego of the character. There is another ego, according to whose action the individual is unrecognisable.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, p. 198, letter, June 5, 1914, to Edward Garnett, Heinemann (1932).
  • 80.
    Reason is a supple nymph, and slippery as a fish by nature. She had as leave give her kiss to an absurdity any day, as to syllogistic truth. The absurdity may turn out truer.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. repr. in Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D.H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. E. McDonald (1936). "Introduction to The Dragon of the Apocalypse by Frederick Carter," London Mercury (July 1930). Carter's book eventually appeared under a different title and without Lawrence's introduction.

    Read more quotations about / on: fish, kiss, leave, truth, nature
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