Quotations From D.H. (DAVID HERBERT) LAWRENCE

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  • 81.
    They had met, and included in their meeting the thrust of the manifold grass stems, the cry of the peewit, the wheel of the stars.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by Duckworth (1913). Sons and Lovers, ch. 13, Penguin Books (1989). "They" are Paul Morel and Clara Dawes.
  • 82.
    The novel is the one bright book of life. Books are not life. They are only tremulations on the ether. But the novel as a tremulation can make the whole man alive tremble.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. "Why the Novel Matters," Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, p. 535, Viking Press (1936).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 83.
    The only rule is, do what you really, impulsively, wish to do. But always act on your own responsibility, sincerely. And have the courage of your own strong emotion.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by T. Seltzer (1922). Fantasia of the Unconscious, ch. 4, Viking Compass (1960).

    Read more quotations about / on: courage
  • 84.
    All vital truth contains the memory of all that for which it is not true.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. letter, Dec. 20, 1914. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 2, eds. George J. Zytaruk and James T. Boulton (1981).

    Read more quotations about / on: memory, truth
  • 85.
    The old ideals are dead as nails—nothing there. It seems to me there remains only this perfect union with a woman—sort of ultimate marriage—and there isn't anything else.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1921). Women in Love, ch. 5, Penguin Books (1987). Rupert Birkin is speaking to Gerald.

    Read more quotations about / on: marriage, perfect, woman
  • 86.
    The only justice is to follow the sincere intuition of the soul, angry or gentle. Anger is just, and pity is just, but judgement is never just.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Studies in Classic American Literature, ch. 2 (1924).

    Read more quotations about / on: anger, justice
  • 87.
    I like Australia less and less. The hateful newness, the democratic conceit, every man a little pope of perfection.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Letter, May 28, 1922. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, eds. James T. Boulton, E. Mansfield, and W. Roberts (1987). Later, after leaving Australia, Lawrence was to write, "Still I haven't extricated all of me out of Australia. In one part of myself I came to love it—really to love it, Australia."
  • 88.
    The more I see of democracy the more I dislike it. It just brings everything down to the mere vulgar level of wages and prices, electric light and water closets, and nothing else.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Letter, June 13, 1922, written in Australia. The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, eds. James T. Boulton, E. Mansfield, and W. Roberts (1987).

    Read more quotations about / on: water, light
  • 89.
    The East is marvellously interesting for tracing our steps back. But for going forward, it is nothing. All it can hope for is to be fertilised by Europe, so that it can start on a new phase.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. The Letters of D. H. Lawrence, pp. 350-51, letter, May 24, 1916, to Lady Ottoline Morrell, Heinemann (1932).

    Read more quotations about / on: hope
  • 90.
    One man isn't any better than another, not because they are equal, but because they are intrinsically other, that there is no term of comparison.
    D.H. (David Herbert) Lawrence (1885-1930), British author. Originally published by M. Secker (1921). Women in Love, ch. 8, Penguin Books (1987). Rupert Birkin is speaking to Gerald.
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