Quotations From DOROTHY PARKER


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  • I misremember who first was cruel enough to nurture the cocktail party into life. But perhaps it would be not too much too say, in fact it would be not enough to say, that it was not worth the trouble.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humor writer. Esquire (New York, Nov. 1964).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • Those who have mastered etiquette, who are entirely, impeccably right, would seem to arrive at a point of exquisite dullness.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. repr. in The Portable Dorothy Parker, pt. 2 (1944, revised 1973). "Mrs. Post Enlarges on Etiquette," The New Yorker (December 31, 1927).
  • All those writers who write about their childhood! Gentle God, if I wrote about mine you wouldn't sit in the same room with me.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).

    Read more quotations about / on: childhood, god
  • I can't talk about Hollywood. It was a horror to me when I was there and it's a horror to look back on. I can't imagine how I did it. When I got away from it I couldn't even refer to the place by name. "Out there," I called it.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Interview in Writers at Work, First Series, ed. Malcolm Cowley (1958).

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  • The affair between Margot Asquith and Margot Asquith will live as one of the prettiest love stories in all literature.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 28, by Leslie Frewin (1986). In a review, probably written in the early 1920s, of the autobiography of Margot Asquith (1864-1945).

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  • Wit has truth in it ... wisecracking is simply calisthenics with words.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 9, by Leslie Frewin (1986). Parker was reputed to be the wittiest woman of her time.

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  • Scratch a lover, and find a foe.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Ballade of a Great Weariness, Enough Rope (1926).
  • Enjoyed it! One more drink and I'd have been under the host.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Quoted in The Algonquin Wits, ed. Robert E. Drennan (1968). On being asked whether she had enjoyed a party.
  • It serves me right for putting all my eggs in one bastard.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. quoted in You Might As Well Live, pt. 2, ch.3, John Keats (1970). On her abortion.
  • That woman speaks eighteen languages and can't say No in any of them.
    Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. Quoted in While Rome Burns, "Our Mrs. Parker," Alexander Woollcott (1934). Referring to a departing guest.

    Read more quotations about / on: woman
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