Quotations From EDGAR ALLAN POE


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  • The skies they were ashen and sober;
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Ulalume (l. 1). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • But see, amid the mimic rout
    A crawling shape intrude!
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Ligeia (l. 25-26). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • It was night, in the lonesome October
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Ulalume (l. 4). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.

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  • A strong argument for the religion of Christ is this—that offences against Charity are about the only ones which men on their death-beds can be made—not to understand—but to feel—as crime.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, July 1849).

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  • And we passed to the end of a vista,
    But were stopped by the door of a tomb—
    By the door of a legended tomb;
    And I said—" What is written, sweet sister,
    On the door of this legended tomb?"
    She replied—"Ulalume—Ulalume!—
    'Tis the vault of thy lost Ulalume!"
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Ulalume (l. 75-81). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.

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  • We now demand the light artillery of the intellect; we need the curt, the condensed, the pointed, the readily diffused—in place of the verbose, the detailed, the voluminous, the inaccessible. On the other hand, the lightness of the artillery should not degenerate into pop-gunnery—by which term we may designate the character of the greater portion of the newspaper press—their sole legitimate object being the discussion of ephemeral matters in an ephemeral manner.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In The Centenary Poe, ed. Montagu Slater (1949). "Magazine Literature," Marginalia (1844-1849).

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  • After reading all that has been written, and after thinking all that can be thought, on the topics of God and the soul, the man who has a right to say that he thinks at all, will find himself face to face with the conclusion that, on these topics, the most profound thought is that which can be the least easily distinguished from the most superficial sentiment.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Graham's Magazine (Philadelphia, Feb. 1848).

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  • The nose of a mob is its imagination. By this, at any time, it can be quietly led.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Virginia, July 1849).

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  • In the misty mid region of Weir—
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Ulalume (l. 7). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • the wind came out of the cloud chilling
    And killing my Annabel Lee.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Annabel Lee (l. 25-26). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.

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