Treasure Island

Quotations From EDGAR ALLAN POE

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  • 21.
    Man's real life is happy, chiefly because he is ever expecting that it soon will be so.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In The Centenary Poe, ed. Montagu Slater (1949). "Re-Living the Old Life," Marginalia (1844-1849).

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  • 22.
    As a viewed myself in a fragment of looking-glass..., I was so impressed with a sense of vague awe at my appearance ... that I was seized with a violent tremour.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Pym, the narrator, in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, ch. 8, Harper and Brothers (1838). Unnerving encounters with an alienating self.
  • 23.
    He made no resistance whatever, and was stabbed in the back.... I must not dwell upon the fearful repast.... Words have no power to impress the mind with the exquisite horror of their reality.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Pym, the narrator, in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, ch. 8, Harper and Brothers (1838). The aesthetic of horror.

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  • 24.
    If in many of my productions terror has been the thesis, I maintain that terror is not of Germany, but of the soul.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Preface to the Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (1840). Poe's most passionate and credible defense of his short stories' authenticity and originality.
  • 25.
    What I here propound is true: ... if by any means it be now trodden down so that it die, it will "rise again to ... Life Everlasting."
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Preface, Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Poet as martyred prophet.

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  • 26.
    TRUE!—nervous—very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad?
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "The Tell-Tale Heart," The Pioneer (1843). Conflicted by occulted guilt, defensiveness and pride.
  • 27.
    Their hotels are bad. Their pumpkin pies are delicious. Their poetry is not so good.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. quoted in Julian Symons, The Tell-Tale Heart: The Life and Works of Edgar Allan Poe, pt. 1, ch. 12 (1978). Broadway Journal (1845).

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  • 28.
    The death ... of a beautiful woman, is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Reflecting on memories of his dying mother.

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  • 29.
    The rudiment of verse may, possibly, be found in the spondee.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Rationale of Verse," American Review (1846). Searching for basic elements.
  • 30.
    In the Original Unity of the First Thing lies the Secondary Cause of All Things, with the Germ of their Inevitable Annihilation.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). The thesis of the creation and the destruction of the universe.
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