Quotations From EDGAR ALLAN POE


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  • And so all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
    Of my darling, my darling, my life and my bride
    In her sepulchre there by the sea—
    In her tomb by the side of the sea.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Annabel Lee (l. 38-41). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.

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  • The radiance was that of the full, setting, and blood-red moon, which now shone vividly through that once barely- discernible fissure,... extending from the roof of the building, in a zigzag direction, to the base. While I gazed, this fissure rapidly widened.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "The Fall of the House of Usher," Burton's Gentleman's Magazine (1839). A metaphor for the defloration of the deceased Madeline Usher.

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  • I was a child and she was a child,
    In this kingdom by the sea;
    But we loved with a love which was more than love --
    I and my Annabel Lee.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. first published in New York Tribune (Oct. 9, 1849). Annabel Lee, st. 2 (written 1845). The poem is addressed to Poe's 13-year-old cousin and wife, Virginia Clemm, who died in 1847 aged 24.

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  • The writer who neglects punctuation, or mispunctuates, is liable to be misunderstood.... For the want of merely a comma, it often occurs that an axiom appears a paradox, or that a sarcasm is converted into a sermonoid.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Graham's Magazine (Philadelphia, Feb. 1848).
  • Romance, who loves to nod and sing,
    With drowsy head and folded wing,
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Romance (l. 1-2). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.

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  • I never can hear a crowd of people singing and gesticulating, all together, at an Italian opera, without fancying myself at Athens, listening to that particular tragedy, by Sophocles, in which he introduces a full chorus of turkeys, who set about bewailing the death of Meleager.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Va., July 1849).

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  • To be thoroughly conversant with a Man's heart, is to take our final lesson in the iron-clasped volume of despair.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). Marginalia, Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Va., June 1849).

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  • Were I called on to define, very briefly, the term Art, I should call it "the reproduction of what the Senses perceive in Nature through the veil of the soul." The mere imitation, however accurate, of what is in Nature, entitles no man to the sacred name of "Artist."
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Virginia, June 1849).

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  • That man is not truly brave who is afraid either to seem or to be, when it suits him, a coward.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). Marginalia, Graham's Magazine (Philadelphia, Dec. 1846).
  • To vilify a great man is the readiest way in which a little man can himself attain greatness.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). "Marginalia," Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Virginia, July 1849).
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