Quotations From EDGAR ALLAN POE

» More about Edgar Allan Poe on Poemhunter

 

  • 41.
    In criticism I will be bold, and as sternly, absolutely just with friend and foe. From this purpose nothing shall turn me.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. letter, Jan. 17, 1841.

    Read more quotations about / on: friend
  • 42.
    It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841).
  • 43.
    The best chess-player in Christendom may be little more than the best player of chess; but proficiency in whist implies capacity for success in all these more important undertakings where mind struggles with mind.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841).

    Read more quotations about / on: success
  • 44.
    This wild star—it is now three centuries since, with clasped hands, and with streaming eyes,... I spoke it ... into birth.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The angel Agathos, in "The Power of Words," Democratic Review (1845). Expressing Poe's longing for telekinetic powers.

    Read more quotations about / on: star, birth
  • 45.
    The next work of Carlyle will be entitled "Bow-Wow," and the title-page will have a motto from the opening chapter of the Koran: "There is no error in this Book."
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. repr. In Essays and Reviews (1984). Marginalia, Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Virginia, July 1849).

    Read more quotations about / on: work
  • 46.
    Nor had I erred in my calculations—nor had I endured in vain. I at length felt that I was free.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "The Pit and the Pendulum," The Gift (1842). Ratiocination propelled by the life instinct.
  • 47.
    You have conquered, and I yield. Yet, henceforward art thou ... dead to the World, to Heaven and to Hope! In me didst thou exist—and, in my death, see by this image, which is thine own, how utterly thou has murdered thyself.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator's double, in "William Wilson," The Gift (1839). Murder as suicide.

    Read more quotations about / on: hope, heaven, death, world
  • 48.
    It is the curse of a certain order of mind, that it can never rest satisfied with the consciousness of its ability to do a thing. Still less is it content with doing it. It must both know and show how it was done.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "Marginalia 70," United States Magazine, and Democratic Review (1844). Driven by the need to explain the "modus operandi" of every activity.
  • 49.
    The usual derivation of the word Metaphysics is not to be sustained ... the science is supposed to take its name from its superiority to physics. The truth is, that Aristotle's treatise on Morals is next in succession to his Book of Physics.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "Pinakidia 157," Southern Literary Messenger (1836). Betraying ambivalence to transcendentalism.

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
  • 50.
    What can be more soothing, at once to a man's Pride, and to his Conscience, than the conviction that, in taking vengeance on his enemies for injustice done him, he has simply to do them justice in return?
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "Marginalia 252," Southern Literary Messenger (1849). Pride eclipsing reason in the attempt to justify revenge.

    Read more quotations about / on: pride, justice
[Hata Bildir]