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Quotations From EDMUND BURKE


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  • A nation is not conquered which is perpetually to be conquered.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775. On conciliation with America.
  • The tyranny of a multitude is a multiplied tyranny.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. letter, Feb. 26, 1790.
  • No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. The Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, pt. 2, ch. 2 (1756).

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  • Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. The Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, Introduction (1756).

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  • Custom reconciles us to everything.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. The Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, pt. 4, sct. 18 (1756).
  • All government—indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue and every prudent act—is founded on compromise and barter.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech on Conciliation with America, March 22, 1775.
  • Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgement; and he betrays instead of serving you if he sacrifices it to your opinion.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. speech, Nov. 3, 1774. Speech to the Electors of Bristol, Works, vol. 2 (1899).
  • Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol, April 3, 1777, repr. In Works, vol. 2 (1899).

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  • We must not always judge of the generality of the opinion by the noise of the acclamation.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letters on a Regicide Peace, letter 1 (1796), repr. In The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • Nothing turns out to be so oppressive and unjust as a feeble government.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).
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