Post more comments
Want a gift card for being active Forum member? Post comments and win $25 gift card every week.
Rules:
PoemHunter.com will be giving away Amazon.com gift cards (worth $75 in total) every week to first three members ($25 each) who participate most in our forum discussions. You just have to post comments on forum pages, poet pages or poem pages anywhere inside PoemHunter.com
Comments posted needs to be in different pages. Posting more than 1 comment on the same page will only be counted once.
Members can not post comments without being logged in.
PoemHunter.com has the right to cancel or edit this contest.
PoemHunter.com has a right to disqualify or ban member(s) without providing any type of reason, belief or proof in regards to any type of illegal activity or fraud.

Quotations From EDMUND BURKE

» More about Edmund Burke on Poemhunter

 

  • 51.
    Kings will be tyrants from policy, when subjects are rebels from principle.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).
  • 52.
    The march of the human mind is slow.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775, House of Commons, London. Second Speech on Conciliation with America: The Thirteen Resolutions, Works, vol. 2 (1899).
  • 53.
    It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. "The Present State of the Nation," Observations on a Publication (1769).
  • 54.
    The great must submit to the dominion of prudence and of virtue, or none will long submit to the dominion of the great.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter, May 26, 1795. The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • 55.
    Laws, like houses, lean on one another.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Tracts Relating to Poperty Laws, ch. 3, pt. 1 (1765), repr. In The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • 56.
    A people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775, House of Commons, London. Second Speech on Conciliation with America: The Thirteen Resolutions, Works, vol. 2 (1899).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 57.
    I do not know a method of drawing up an indictment against a whole people.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775, House of Commons, London. Second Speech on Conciliation with America: The Thirteen Resolutions, Works, vol. 2 (1899).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 58.
    Young man, there is America, which at this day serves for little more than to amuse you with stories of savage men and uncouth manners.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775, House of Commons, London. Second Speech on Conciliation with America: The Thirteen Resolutions, Works, vol. 2 (1899).

    Read more quotations about / on: america
  • 59.
    We know, and it is our pride to know, that man is by his constitution a religious animal.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish Protestant political writer. Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 80, ed. Pocock (1790).

    Read more quotations about / on: animal, pride
  • 60.
    But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever.
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish Protestant political writer. Reflections on the Revolution in France, p. 66, ed. Pocock (1790).

    Read more quotations about / on: forever, gone
[Hata Bildir]