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Quotations From ELIZABETH DREW


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  • The torment of human frustration, whatever its immediate cause, is the knowledge that the self is in prison, its vital force and "mangled mind" leaking away in lonely, wasteful self-conflict.
    Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), Anglo-American author, critic. Poetry: A Modern Guide to Its Understanding and Enjoyment, pt. 2, ch. 13 (1959).

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  • Propaganda has a bad name, but its root meaning is simply to disseminate through a medium, and all writing therefore is propaganda for something. It's a seeding of the self in the consciousness of others.
    Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), Anglo-American author, critic. Poetry: A Modern Guide to Its Understanding and Enjoyment, pt. 2, ch. 10 (1959).
  • Language is like soil. However rich, it is subject to erosion, and its fertility is constantly threatened by uses that exhaust its vitality. It needs constant re-invigoration if it is not to become arid and sterile.
    Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), Anglo-American author, critic. Poetry: A Modern Guide to Its Understanding and Enjoyment, ch. 5, Dell Publishing Co. (1959).
  • The test of literature is, I suppose, whether we ourselves live more intensely for the reading of it.
    Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), Anglo-American author, critic. "Is There a 'Feminine' Fiction?" The Modern Novel (1926).
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