Treasure Island

Quotations From FEODOR DOSTOYEVSKY

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  • 1.
    Power is given only to those who dare to lower themselves and pick it up. Only one thing matters, one thing; to be able to dare!
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Raskolnikov, in Crime and Punishment, pt. 5, ch. 4 (published 1866), trans. by David McDuff (1991). Raskolnikov explains to Sonya his motives for committing murder: "I wanted to make the dare, and so I killed someone."

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  • 2.
    Sarcasm: the last refuge of modest and chaste-souled people when the privacy of their soul is coarsely and intrusively invaded.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Notes from Underground, ch. 2, sct. 4 (1864).

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  • 3.
    Man, so long as he remains free, has no more constant and agonizing anxiety than find as quickly as possible someone to worship.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Ivan Karamazov, in The Brothers Karamazov, bk. 5, ch. 5 (published 1879-1880), trans. by David Magarshak (1958). Reporting the words of the Grand Inquisitor.
  • 4.
    If the devil doesn't exist and, therefore, man has created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Ivan Karamazov, in The Brothers Karamazov, bk. 5, ch. 4 (published 1879-1888), trans. by David Magarshak (1958).
  • 5.
    Men do not accept their prophets and slay them, but they love their martyrs and worship those whom they have tortured to death.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Father Zossima, in The Brothers Karamazov, bk. 6, ch. 3, sct. H (1879-1880), trans. by David Magarshak (1958).

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  • 6.
    The cleverest of all, in my opinion, is the man who calls himself a fool at least once a month.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Ivan Ivanovich, in "Bobok," A Writer's Diary (1873).
  • 7.
    A real gentleman, even if he loses everything he owns, must show no emotion. Money must be so far beneath a gentleman that it is hardly worth troubling about.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. The Gambler, ch. 2 (1866).

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  • 8.
    If you were to destroy the belief in immortality in mankind, not only love but every living force on which the continuation of all life in the world depended, would dry up at once.
    Feodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), Russian novelist. Mr. Miusov, in The Brothers Karamazov, bk. 2, ch. 6 (published 1879-1880), trans. by David Magarshak (1958).

    Read more quotations about / on: love, world, life
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