Quotations From FRANCES WRIGHT


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  • Let us unite on the safe and sure ground of fact and experiment, and we can never err; yet better, we can never differ.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, address 3 (1829). From a speech given on the occasion of the opening of the Hall of Science in New York City (April 26, 1829).
  • Religion ... may be defined thus: a belief in, and homage rendered to, existences unseen and causes unknown.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 5 (1829).
  • To give liberty to a slave before he understands its value is, perhaps, rather to impose a penalty than to bestow a blessing ...
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Views of Society and Manners in America, April 1820 entry (1821). Wright, a visiting Scotswoman who later settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, would eventually advocate a program of gradual emancipation from slavery.
  • ... the happiness of a people is the only rational object of government, and the only object for which a people, free to choose, can have a government at all.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, address 1 (1829). From a lecture given on July 4, 1828.

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  • We have ... dreamed so much and observed so little, that our imaginations have grown larger than the world we live in, and our judgments have dwindled down to a point.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 3 (1829). On assertion and belief not based on science, fact, evidence.

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  • Persecution for opinion is the master vice of society.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 6 (1829).
  • ... the condition of women affords, in all countries, the best criterion by which to judge the character of men.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Views of Society and Manners in America, March 1820 entry (1821).

    Read more quotations about / on: women
  • The best road to correct reasoning is by physical science; the way to trace effects to causes is through physical science; the only corrective, therefore, of superstition is physical science.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 3 (1829).
  • ... the hired preachers of all sects, creeds, and religions, never do, and never can, teach any thing but what is in conformity with the opinions of those who pay them.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 3 (1829).
  • The sciences have ever been the surest guides to virtue.
    Frances Wright (1795-1852), Scottish author and speaker; relocated to America. Course of Popular Lectures, lecture 5 (1829).
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