Quotations From FRANK W WEAD

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  • Listen, sister. I don't dance and I can't take time out now to learn.
    Frank W. Wead (1895?-1947), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Lt. Rusty Ryan (John Wayne), They Were Expendable, reply to nurse Lt. Sandy Davis (Donna Reed), who invites him to a dance (1945). Based on the book by William L. White.

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  • You men have proved that PT boats have some value in this war. Washington wants you back in the States to build them up. Those are my orders.
    Frank W. Wead (1895?-1947), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. General Martin (Jack Holt), They Were Expendable, informing Lts. Ryan and Brickley that they are being sent home, but their men are being left behind, possibly to die (1945). Based on the book by William L. White.

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  • You know what I'm talking about. This business has changed. Flyers aren't pilots anymore, they're engineers. This is a college man's game. Our work is done. The pioneering is over.
    Frank W. Wead (1895?-1947), U.S. screenwriter, and Howard Hawks. Dizzy Davis (James Cagney), Ceiling Zero, acknowledging that flying has changed, that feats of daring have been replaced by technical expertise (1935). Based On a Play By Fran.

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  • Listen, son. You and I are professionals. If the manager says sacrifice, we lay down a bunt and let somebody else hit the homeruns.
    Frank W. Wead (1895?-1947), U.S. screenwriter, and John Ford. Admiral Blackwell (Charles Trowbridge), They Were Expendable, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, when Lt. Brickley (Robert Montgomery) learns that his squadron will be running messages rather than retaliating against the Japanese (1945). Based on the book by William L. White.

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