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Quotations From FRANZ KAFKA

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  • 81.
    Anyone who renounces the world must love all men, for he renounces their world too. He thus begins to have some inkling of the true nature of man, which cannot but be loved, always assuming that one is its peer.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish Jewish author of novels, stories, diaries and reflections. The Third Notebook, December 9, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: world, nature, love
  • 82.
    If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without climbing it, it would have been permitted.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, November 9, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • 83.
    Two possibilities: making oneself infinitely small or being so. The second is perfection, that is to say, inactivity, the first is beginning, that is to say, action.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, January 28, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • 84.
    Evil is the radiation of the human consciousness in certain transitional positions. It is not actually the sensual world that is a mere appearance; what is so is the evil of it, which, admittedly, is what constitutes the sensual world in our eyes.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, January 18, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: evil, world
  • 85.
    Humility provides everyone, even him who despairs in solitude, with the strongest relationship to his fellow man, and this immediately, though, of course, only in the case of complete and permanent humility.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Fourth Notebook, February 24, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).

    Read more quotations about / on: solitude
  • 86.
    One advantage in keeping a diary is that you become aware with reassuring clarity of the changes which you constantly suffer.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. Entry December 23, 1911. Diaries: 1910-1913, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Joseph Kresh, New York, Schocken Books (1948).
  • 87.
    The founder brought the laws from the lawgiver; the faithful are meant to announce the laws to the lawgiver.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, November 21, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • 88.
    It is not necessary that you leave the house. Remain at your table and listen. Do not even listen, only wait. Do not even wait, be wholly still and alone. The world will present itself to you for its unmasking, it can do no other, in ecstacy it will writhe at your feet.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Czech novelist, short story writer. written Oct. 1917-Feb. 1918. The Collected Aphorisms, vol. 1, no. 109, Shorter Works, ed. and trans. by Malcolm Pasley (1973).

    Read more quotations about / on: leave, house, alone, world
  • 89.
    Writers speak stench.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. Entry before May 17, 1910. Diaries: 1910-1913, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Joseph Kresh, New York, Schocken Books (1948).
  • 90.
    My "fear" ... is my substance, and probably the best part of me.
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German novelist, short-story writer. Letter to Milena Jesensk√°. Quoted in Margarete Buber-Neumann, Milena, ch. 7 (1989).

    Read more quotations about / on: fear
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