Quotations From G.C. (GEORG CHRISTOPH) LICHTENBERG

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  • 51.
    Actual aristocracy cannot be abolished by any law: all the law can do is decree how it is to be imparted and who is to acquire it.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook L," aphorism 44, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 52.
    He was always smoothing and polishing himself, and in the end he became blunt before he was sharp.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook L," aph. 70, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 53.
    Virtue by premeditation isn't worth much.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook H," aph. 13, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 54.
    Just as the performance of the vilest and most wicked deeds requires spirit and talent, so even the greatest demand a certain insensitivity which under other circumstances we would call stupidity.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook F," aph. 87, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 55.
    It is said that truth comes from the mouths of fools and children: I wish every good mind which feels an inclination for satire would reflect that the finest satirist always has something of both in him.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook J," aph. 157, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth, children
  • 56.
    To receive applause for works which do not demand all our powers hinders our advance towards a perfecting of our spirit. It usually means that thereafter we stand still.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook K," aphorism 42, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 57.
    One might call habit a moral friction: something that prevents the mind from gliding over things but connects it with them and makes it hard for it to free itself from them.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook A," aph. 10, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 58.
    It is in the gift for employing all the vicissitudes of life to one's own advantage and to that of one's craft that a large part of genius consists.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook K," aphorism 48, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 59.
    Before we blame we should first see whether we cannot excuse.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook K," aph. 39, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).
  • 60.
    The greatest events occur without intention playing any part in them; chance makes good mistakes and undoes the most carefully planned undertaking. The world's greatest events are not produced, they happen.
    G.C. (Georg Christoph) Lichtenberg (1742-1799), German physicist, philosopher. "Notebook K," aph. 68, Aphorisms (written 1765-1799), trans. by R.J. Hollingdale (1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
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